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Fields, Adam. USCT Pension File Summary, Company F, 33rd USCT, Beaufort, SC

Biographical Summary

Adam Fields was born enslaved about 1 January or March 1842 at Ladies Island, Beaufort County, SC. His father was Tony Fields and his mother was Charlotte Fields. He was enslaved by John Reynolds, as were his parents. [Another records shows his slaveholder to be Richard Runnels.] He had a brother named Paul Fields who served in Company C of the 33rd United States Colored Troops. 

Adam was married to Louisa McCoy about November 1867 at Ellis Plantation, Beaufort, SC by Rev. Woodworth (or Woodruff). His widow’s statement regarding their marriage gave the date as 17 March 1893. She stated that Rev. Sanders performed the ceremony. Their children were: Tony Fields, born about 1869, dead; Louisa Fields, born about 1872, dead; Caroline Fields, born about 1874 living [at the time of the statement in 1915]; Paul Fields, born about 1878, living [at the time of the statement in 1915].

Adam died on 3 September 1916 at Roper Hospital in Charleston, SC. He was buried in the National Cemetery in Beaufort, SC in September 1916.

USCT Service

Adam Fields enlisted in April 1862 and served for three months in Company B, 33rd Regiment USCT. He re-enlisted as a private in Company F, 33rd USC Infantry 22 April 1863. He was honorably discharged on 25 April 1865. He was pensioned at $23 per month under Act of 11 May 1912.

Status of Pension Application

Adam Fields’ pension application was assigned Certificate #525489. His claim for an increase under the Act of Feb 6, 1907 was rejected because he could not provide evidence that he was 70 years old.

Summary of Testimony

 

Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

Excerpt, Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

 

M. Crandall, M.D.

Certificate of Discharge for Medical Disability, M. Crandall, MD, 25 April 1865: Adam Fields, a private, of Captain John M. Thompson, Company F, 33rd Regiment of USCT was enlisted by Capt. James S. Rogers at Beaufort, SC on 22 April 1863 to serve three years. He was born at Ladies [sic] Island, SC, and was 23 years of age. He was 5-feet 7-inches tall, with black complexion, dark eyes and black hair. When he enlisted his occupation was that of a field hand. During his last two months of service, he had been unfit for duty for 60 days. He was considered totally incapable of performing the duties of a soldier owing to physical deformity of limb and had not done duty for eighteen months. He had an angular deformity outwards at the right knee joint and lameness caused by a fall from a house before enlisting.

 

Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

Discharge Certificate, Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

 

Adam Fields

Summary of Compiled Service Record for Adam Fields, 15 May 1880: He was 49 years old and a resident of Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC. He enlisted on 23 April 1863 in Company F. 33rd Regiment USC Infantry commanded by Capt. Thompson. He was honorably discharged at Savannah, GA in May 1865. He was 5-feet 9-inches tall with dark complexion, hair, and eyes. He was taken with the measles at Fort Pocataligo, SC on or about 20 January 1865. They settled in his lungs and in the small of his back. He continued to suffer from the effects at the time of his statement. He stated he was never in a hospital and was discharged as soon as he got the measles. His occupation had been that of a farmer. Also appearing were J.H. Brown of Port Royal Island and J.I. Washington of Beaufort.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 8 August 1881: He was 54 years of age and a resident of Ellis, Port Royal Island, Beaufort County, SC. He had been issued a pension because of rheumatism and dyspepsia. He served as a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment, USCT. He stated that both the rheumatism and dyspepsia had increased over the last six months and that most of the time he was able to get about. He was also troubled with shortness of breath and coughing. Also appearing were Clarence Kennon and James Devlin, both of Beaufort, SC.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 29 May 1886: He was treated by Drs. Crandal and Hawk while in the service. He was treated by Dr. Benton after discharge. He did not know where any of the offiers of his company were.

Joseph Richardson

Summary of evidence of Joseph Richardson, 29 May 1886: He and Adam Fields belonged to the same company and regiment. Adam got the measles while the company was at Pocataligo, SC in February 1865. Then he seemed to have gotten a cold. From that he began to suffer with pain in his back. He was discharged with those pains. Adam was a sound man before he got the measles at Pocataligo, SC in 1865. He was never well after that and complained of pain in the back and [illegible]. He could do but little work at the time of this statement.

Wally Matthews

Summary of statement of Wally Mathews, 19 June 1886: He knew Adam Fields before the war as he belonged to Mr. Reynolds and Wally belonged to Thomas Baynard. The settlements were near each other and they saw one another at least every Friday. He remembered when Adam enlisted and knew him to be a sound man who was a full hand for field work. After coming out of the service, Wally had a better opportunity to know Adam’s condition because Adam had a wife on the Baynard place. He quite often got to visit Wally’s house. Adam began complaining of pain in his legs and a general weakness. Wally heard Adam say that Adam was discharged before his time was out because he could not do his duty. He continually went to Beaufort for medicine. He had not be able to do half a man’s labor at the time of this statement.

A.P. Prioleau, M.D.

Summary of report of A.P. Prioleau, MD, 24 November 1886: Adam Fields belonged to Company F, 33rd USC Infantry. He was suffering from disease of the back and lungs as a result of measles. He was 5-feet 8-inches tall, 168 lbs., and 46 years old. He was discharged from the army on account of disability that he had been suffering from ever since. He found there to be no signs of disease of the lungs. There was no tenderness in the spinal tract, atrophy, or contractions of the soft parts of the back. His symptoms, the doctor reported, would lead one to judge that Adam Fields did suffer occasionally, but there were no physical signs of the cause.

Adjutant General

Summary of report of Adjutant General, 23 February 1887: Adam Fields was enrolled on 22 April 1863  at Beaufort, SC as a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment USCT to serve three years. He was reported on Muster Rolls for May and June, and to 28 February 1865 as present for duty. March and April 1865 showed him discharge on 25 April 1865. He was discharged on Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability, 25 April 1865 at Savannah, GA. Regimental hospital records from 1 August 1863 to discharge showed him treated on 1 January 1864 with a fever. On 15 August 1864, there was neither diagnosis nor prescription. On 10 October 1864, he was treated for bronchitis. Returns covering from October 1863 to July 1865 showed him, in March 1865, detailed to Post Hospital in Savannah, GA. Records on file furnished no evidence of disabilities alleged nor did they furnish any additional information as to a disability during his service.

Cain Jenkins

Summary of statement of Cain Jenkins, 29 November 1887: He lived within a half mile of Adam Fields and had done so for 40 years. He knew Adam well before Adam enlisted and equally as well after he was discharged. He went home from the service in May 1865, nearly a year before his regiment disbanded. He was discharged because of disability consisting of extreme weakness in his back and legs. At the time of the statement, Cain knew Adam could not do any heavy work and believed he would not be able to do more than half an ordinary man’s labor. He saw Adam at least once a week and sometimes every day at the time of his statement.

Joseph Simmons

Summary of statement of Joseph Simmons, 29 November 1887: He lived near Adam Fields and had known him since the war as well as prior to Adam’s enlistment. He was sent home from service in May 1865, just after peace came, and nearly a year before the regiment was discharged. He was sent home because of his sickness of the back and legs that made him limp when he walked. Joseph learned that Adam was unable to keep up with his company on a march. He had seen Adam nearly every day since he was discharged and believed he was at least one-half disabled.

Adam Fields

Summary of the statement of Adam Fields, 28 January 1888: He was unable to furnish medical evidence of his troubles since the time of his discharge because the doctors who had attended him were dead, Dr. Benton and Dr. A.S. Gibbs. He had not seen any other doctor since Dr. Gibbs. He stated he was never in the hospital during his time of service but was sick in camp and took medicine given him by Dr. Hawk and Crandle.

Edward Washington

Summary of statement of Edward Washington, 3 January 1889: He was a private in Company F, 33rd USC Infantry from December 1862 to January 1866. He was raised near Georgetown, SC and joined the army at Camp Saxon, Beaufort, SC. He met Adam Fields some time in 1863. As far as he could recall, Adam was a well man when he first entered the army. Then he began complaining of some disease at Camp Shaw, SC in 1864. He got sick and was discharged at Savannah, GA because of his disease. Edward did not know whether Adam was troubled by a pile on his backside, had pain in his back, or an injured knee. He did not know if Adam had rheumatism.

Bristow Eddy

Summary of statement of Bristow Eddy, 21 January 1889: He was a carpenter and was a corporal in Company F, 33rd USC Infantry from November 1862 until February 1866. He knew Adam Fields. He was in the same company as Bristow. If Adam was diseased, Bristow did not know it. He recalled Adam complaining in the army but could not recall the time nor the place. He did not know what ailed Adam. He may have complained of trouble with his legs and feet. He did not know if Adam had rheumatism, back disease, or measles in the army or if his lungs were affected. He thought Adam Fields was discharged at Savannah, GA sometime in the Spring of 1865 from a disease of the legs but he was not positive about that. He knew nothing of Adam having measles at Pocataligo, SC while in the army. He had not known Adam since the war ended.

Toby McKnight

Summary of statement of Toby McKnight, 22 January 1889: He was a private in Company F, 33rd USCT from October 1862 to May 1865. He knew Adam Fields a short time before Toby joined the army. He was a sound man and Toby thought Adam complained of having bad feet and was unable to mark very much. He did not recall whether Adam had measles or whether he had any disease of the back and lungs. He knew Adam after the war and knew he complained of his feet and rheumatism.

Jack Turner

Summary of statement of Jack Turner, 23 January 1889: He served as a private in Company F, 33rd USC Infantry from 20 November 1862 to October 1863. He met Adam Fields at the time Jack joined the army.

Jack was discharged before Adam but he had seen Adam since Adam’s discharge. He complained of some trouble but Jack did not know what. He thought he had heard of Adam having measles and lung disease.

Joseph Simmons

Summary of statement of Joseph Simmons, 25 January 1889: He knew Adam Fields from the time Adam was a small boy. He was raised within one mile of him by Wm Elliott and Adam was raised by John Reynolds. He knew Adam up to the time Adam enlisted and saw him at the time he was discharged. He knew at that time Adam was sick and lame in his legs and back. He had been a neighbor of Adam and knew him to complain constantly about the pain in his legs and back. He thought Adam saw Dr. Gibbs and Dr. Benton for treatment after Adam left the service. He thought Adam had rheumatism. He did not think Adam was able to do much work since the war. He knew Adam was injured as a boy but he was not hurt very much. He may have hurt his legs, arm, and maybe his back but he recovered. He was sound when he enlisted in the army.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 25 January 1889: He served in Company F, 33rd USC Infantry from April 1863 until May 1865 when he was discharged at Savannah, GA for disability. He was raised near Beaufort, SC and was the slave of John Reynolds. He was living with him when he joined the army. When he was about 12 years of age he fell down the stairway at his old master’s house and skinned up his right leg and arm, and hurt his side a little. He did not disjoint his leg or hurt his back. He had only a slight injury. He was not treated by any doctors. His mother and father gave him some treatment to rub on his leg and arm with vinegar and lye. He felt some pains in his arm and leg but was not disabled from doing any good work. When he joined the army, his right leg was a little crooked about the knee and his right arm sometimes pained him before he joined the army. The crookedness and pain in his arm, he said, were probably caused by the fall from the stairway. Adam stated that his right leg got worse every year. He first felt pain in his back at Honey Hill, SC in December 1864 when cold settled in his back. He was down in camp for three weeks and not able to get about because of his back. At times his legs would swell up and his arm and back would pain him. He was not able to get out of bed. He used a kind of liniment that did some good. Drs. Gibbs and Bennett treated him for the first five years after he was discharged. He stated he had the rheumatism from hard marching and standing on ground at night in the damp air and lying on the damp ground. He had measles at Pocataligo, SC some time in January 1865. They settled in his back and on his lungs. He could not straighten up to do much good. His chest began to pain him and then he started coughing. He was discharged at Savannah, GA and he had, since discharge, been unable to do more than half work, if that. He could not do heavy work. Wally Mathis, Joseph Simons, Joseph Richardson and Cain Jenkins knew him before the war and after the war.

Cain Jenkins

Summary of statement of Cain Jenkins, 25 January 1889: He knew Adam Fields since Adam was a small boy. They lived very near each other before the war. He always thought Adam was sound up to the time he joined the army. He did not know Adam to complain of any disease before the war. He was stout-looking and was able to do good work. Cain did not see Adam while Adam was in the army and he did not know what his physical condition was while in the army. He met Adam soon after he was discharged and he was a sickly man. Adam was discharged from the regiment because he was not able to do his duty. Cain said it appeared Adam was crippled in the legs and he knew Adam was lame. Adam also complained of some disease of the back and was sometimes bothered with a cough, saying his chest pained him. Cain lived within two miles of Adam since the war. They were deacons in the same church.

Wally Mathis

Summary of statement of Wally Mathis, 25 January 1889: He was raised at Jericho near the town of Beaufort, SC. He knew Adam Fields since Adam was a little boy. His was enslaved by Richard Reynolds. They lived within a mile-and-a-half of each other before and up to the time Adam joined the army. He thought Adam enlisted in 1862 and returned home in 1865. He knew Adam to be a sound man when he joined the army and did not know him to complain of any disease. He met up with Adam about the time Adam returned home from the army. At that time, he was sick. His ankles swelled and he could not get around to do any good. His ankles became so swollen and his back was hurting so much that Adam went to see Dr. Gibbs. He was next treated by Dr. Benton. He only knew Adam to complain of his back and swelling of his knees. Adam was unable to work because of his pain and rheumatism. He heard that Adam had fallen down a stair when he was a boy and injured himself. Cain did not see Adam at the time that had happened.

 

Deposition of Wally Mathis, Pension File of Adam Fields

Deposition of Wally Mathis, Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

 

Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

Deposition of Wally Mathis, Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

 

Ishmael Simmons

Summary of statement of Ishmael Simmons, 29 January 1889: He was a private in Company F, 33rd USC Infantry from April 1863 to February 1866. He knew Adam Fields all his life. He was enslaved by Wm Elliott and Adam was enslaved by John Reynolds. They were near neighbors. Before enlisted, Adam was a sound man. Ishmael did not know of Adam being hurt before or after the war. When they enlisted, they were examined by Dr. Crandall and found to be sound, able-bodied men, and able to do their duty as soldiers. Adam first complained of pains in his side, pains in his leg, and diarrhea in the last of 1864 at Pocataligo. After that, he soon began complaining of pain in his right knee and back. The knee looked larger than the other knee. Adam was pretty lame and soon got so back that he could not follow the regiment. When they got to Savannah, GA he was discharged on account of the disabled knee and pain in his back. Ishmael did not see Adam Fields again until Ishmael returned home from the war. Adam was then, at times, not able to do any labor and sometimes had to quit his work because of his knee and back. Ishmael did not know if Adam had fallen down a stair and injured his right knee, side, and right arm before the war.

 

Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

Deposition of Ishmael Simmons, Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

 

Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

Deposition of Ishmael Simmons, Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

 

Joseph Richardson

Summary of statement of Joseph Richardson, 29 January 1889: He was a private in Company F, 33rd USC Infantry from April 1863 to February 1866. He was raised near Beaufort, SC and was enslaved by Thomas Binyard. He knew Adam Fields all of his life. They were raised very near each other and served in the same company during the war. He did not know if Adam had been injured while a child from falling down a stairway or from a horse. He considered him to be sound at Adam’s enlistment. The first time he heard Adam complain of any disease was at Savannah, GA in 1865. He complained of a pain in his right knee and his right side, also the small of his back. Adam was finally discharged because of the pains. He knew Adam had been a farmer and the sometimes he could not get about when the pain in his legs and back are bad. He thought, at the time of his statement, that Adam could do about half as much as an able-bodied man.

Frederick Fripp

Summary of statement of Fredricik Fripp, 1 February 1889: He was a private in Company F, 33rd USC Infantry. He knew Adam Fields before the war, living within a mile of him. They did not join the army at the same time. He knew Adam to be a sound man when he enlisted and knew nothing about him being hurt before the war. Adam complained at Folly Island, SC some time in 1863 of something like rheumatism and pains in his ankles. He was pretty much complaining all the time. He did not recollect whether Adam was discharged before Fredrick was mustered out of the army. Frederick  never saw Adam’s naked ankles and legs, did not know if Adam had a loose knee, pains in his ankles, a cough, or lung disease. He did not know if Adam had measles. He did not know anything of Adam since the end of the war.

Samuel Mack

Summary of statement of Samuel Mack, 6 February 1889: He was a private in Company F, 33rd USCT from April 1863 to 8 February 1866. He was discharged in Charleston, SC. Samuel was raised on Ladies Island and was the slave of Benjamin Sams. He knew Adam Fields since 1862. Adam was a private in the same company as Samuel and they knew each other before they joined the army. At that time, Adam was not disabled in any way. Samuel first heard Adam complain in the latter part of 1864 while they were at Charleston, SC or on the Harbor and James Island. They did a good deal of hard marching and Adam complained of pains in his limbs, mostly his legs. When they got to Honey Hill, he was very bad off and was lame. His legs were crippled and he could hardly walk. When they reached Savannah in the Spring of 1865, Adam was so bad he could not go with the company. They did not see each other until Samuel returned home lived about a quarter mile from Adam. At that time, he was not able to do half the work of an able-bodied man and at times he was not able to work at all. Samuel did not know of any injuries Adam may have had prior to the war.

 

Deposition of Samuel Mack, Pension File of Adam Fields

Deposition of Samuel Mack, Pension File of Adam Fields.

 

Deposition of Samuel Mack, Pension File of Adam Fields

 

Gordon Middleton

Summary of statement of Gordon Middleton, 6 February 1889: He was a private in Company F, 33rd USC Infantry. He enlisted in May 1863 and was discharged in February 1866 at Charleston, SC. He first met Adam Fields when Gordon joined the army. He was a sound man at that time. Then he began complaining of some trouble in his legs and ankles and was not able to do his duty for some time. Gordon knew Adam was lame in his legs. He lived within a mile-and-a-quarter of Adam since the war ended. He knew Adam was not able to do much work. He was always complaining and got pretty lame because of his leg pains. He did not know if Adam had measles or lung disease.

Cato Stewart

Summary of statement of Cato Stewart, 7 February 1889: He knew Adam Fields since Adam was a child. Adam was owned by John Reynolds before the war and Cato lived hear him. He did not know if Adam was disabled before the war or when he joined the army. He thought he met Adam a short time after Adam returned home from the service and he appeared to be crippled up on one of his legs. Adam told him about the rheumatic pain in his legs. He thought Adam was lame. He had never heard Adam complain about his lungs. Cato had heard that Adam fell down a stairway when he was a boy but he did not know whether he was injured.

Bristow Jackson

Summary of statement of Bristow Jackson, 7 February 1889: He was raised on Port Royal Island, SC. He knew Adam Fields since Adam was a young boy. He lived near Adam before the war. He thought Adam was a short, hardy young man before the war and did not have any diseased legs, back or arm. He saw Adam a short time after he returned from the army in 1865 and he was sick, complaining of some disease of the legs and back. He thought one of Adam’s legs had been injured while Adam was in the army. He knew Adam to be lame after discharge. He did not know that may have caused  the lameness. He did not know of any other disease including lung disease.

John Pitt

Summary of statement of John Pitt, 28 March 1889: He enlisted in Company F, 33rd Regiment USCT at Beaufort, SC in April 1863. He served with that company until the Fall of 1864. He recollected having known of Adam Fields but did not know if they were in the same company and regiment.

Abram Lancaster

Summary of statement of Abram Lancaster, 13 April 1889: He was about 50 years of age and a carpenter. He was born and raised in St. Augustine, FL and had lived there all his life. He enlisted in Company F, 33rd USCT on 20 January 1863 and served until 31 January 1866 when he was discharged. He knew Adam Fields because they were in the same company. He knew him to be about 5-feet 10-inches and quite dark. He first met Adam when they were mustered in at Beaufort, SC. He remembered Adam being bowlegged and troubled with rheumatism. In the service Adam had moon blindness but got over that. He was treated by Dr. Hawks, the surgeon. He remembered Adam having told Abram that he was lame and troubled with rheumatism when he was a slave. He shared a tent with Adam Fields. He did not know whether Adam had the measles while in the service. He did not remember Adam having a cough or complaining of lung trouble. Adam was discharged a year before Abram and Abram had not seen Adam since Adam’s discharge. He stated he used to hear Adam tell about being thrown from a horse when he was a boy and having injured one of his legs. Capt. Thompson used to get at Adam about walking stooped over. He and Adam were good friends in the service.

John M. Hawks, M.D.

Summary of statement of John M. Hawks, MD, 22 June 1889: He was a physician and surgeon. He was an assistant surgeon in Company F, 33rd Regiment from October 1862 until October 1863 when he was transferred to the 21st USCT as a surgeon. He did not recollect such a man, Adam Fields.

Jacob Lawrence

Summary of statement of Jacob Lawrence, 24 August 1889: He was acquainted with Adam Fields and knew he was a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment USCT Volunteers who was discharged at Savannah, GA in May 1865 because of being unfit for service. He knew he was troubled with rheumatism and a disease of the lungs. He knew Adam became disabled near Old Pocataligo, SC about the winter of 1864 . While he was engaged in ripping up railroad track to prevent the rebels from passing from Charleston to Savannah, he was overstrained and from exposure, caught a severe cold that resulted in the lung trouble and rheumatism. He served in the same company and regiment with Adam and he lived near him after Lawrence was discharged. He said Adam’s condition had gotten worse year after year. Adam’s disabilities prevented him from doing any manual labor one-half of the time. He had known Adam for 40 years.

Thomas C. Wallace

Summary of statement of Thomas C. Wallace, 24 August 1889: He was well acquainted with Adam Fields from 1858 until the time of his statement. There were times when they would see each other every week. He knew that from 1865 to 1889 Adam had been suffering with lung disease and rheumatism in the right leg. He frequently had symptoms of sever coughing and severe pains in the right leg. He knew that Adam was unable to perform manual labor one-half of the time from 1865 to 1889.

Cain Carter

Summary of statement of Cain Carter, 26 October 1889: He had been a private in Company C, 33rd Regiment USCT. He was acquainted with Adam Fields from boyhood and at the time of enlistment, Adam was a sound, hardy man. He knew Adam was taken down sick with a lung disease about January 1865 at Savannah, GA. He knew Adam was discharged because of that in May 1865. Adam contracted the disease because of exposure during the hard winter of 1864-1865. Adam was so sick with his disease at Savannah, GA that he was discharged. Before he joined the army, Adam was always a very large, strong and hardy man. He never complained of being sick.

Joseph I. Richardson

Summary of statement of Joseph I. Richardson, 26 October 1889: He was a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment USCT and was well acquainted with Adam Fields since 1862. He was a sound, hardy man. While in the line of duty, about January 1865 at Savannah, GA, he was taken sick with lung disease. He was so sick that he was sent to the camp hospital under treatment of the Regimental Surgeon. Adam’s sickness was contracted with he was exposed to the rain and hard cold in the winter of 1864-1865. He caught a severe cold that settled in his lungs and caused lung disease. He was discharged from the service because of that sometime in May 1865.

Cain Jenkins

Summary of Cain Jenkins, 26 October 1889: He knew Adam Fields since boyhood and never knew him to complain of any kind of rheumatism or lung disease before Adam joined the army. After Adam enlisted he caught a severe cold because of exposure and that settled in his lungs and caused lung disease. Adam was in the camp hospital at Savannah and since then his sickness got worse every year. He was discharged because of that. He had never been a well man since the day he was discharged up to the time of this statement.

Abraham Haywood

Summary of statement of Abraham Haywood, 26 October 1889: He said Adam Fields was suffering from the same lung disease for which he was discharged from the service at Savannah, GA in May 1865. He and Adam Fields grew up together as neighbors before the war. Adam did not complain of any lung disease or rheumatism before he joined the arm. He belonged to Company F and Abram [Abraham] was member of Company B of the same regiment. The could meet each other on a daily basis. Adam was a well, hardy man before the service. Abraham knew Adam was discharged in May 1865 on account of his physical disability. He could not make a full day’s work and could not make his own support.

Jacob S. Simmons

Summary of statement of Jacob S. Simmons, 26 October 1889: When he first met Adam Fields, Adam was suffering very much with lung disease that the caught in the service. Adam was a well man before he joined the army. Jacob and Adam were raised together as near neighbors from their boyhood. Adam never complained about rheumatism before joining the service. He was sound and hardy when he enlisted. He served faithfully until his discharge. He was discharged because of his physical disability. Jacob and Adam attended the same church and saw each other every day of their lives.

Toby Taylor

Summary of statement of Toby Taylor, 26 October 1889: He knew Adam Fields caught lung disease when he was in the service and was discharged because of that. He was also subject to pain from rheumatism. Adam was discharged in 1865 because of his physical disability and he was sent home. Adam was unable to support himself, at the time of this statement, on account of his disease.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 26 October 1889: He joined the army at Beaufort County, Beaufort, SC in November 1862 and was a sound, hardy man. He had no rheumatism or lung disease before he enlisted. He was discharged at Savannah, GA sometime in 1865. His disease came on him by exposure in the cold winter of 1864. He was put in the hospital under treatment of the surgeon doctor. I did not run away from government service nor did he desert it. He was honorably discharged in May 1865 at Savannah, GA on account of his physical disability. He was, at the time of his statement, unable to support himself because of his disabilities.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 26 July 189[not completed]: He was 53 years old and a resident of Port Royal, Beaufort County, SC. He enrolled on 23 April 1863 in Company F, 33rd USCT as a private. He was discharged at Savannah, GA on 23 May 1865 by reason of disease of the lungs and back as a result of measles. Also appearing were Prince Robinson and F.C. Garrett of Beaufort, SC who both knew Adam Fields for 30 years.

Arthur P. Prioleau, M.D.

Summary of report of Arthur P. Prioleau, MD, 17 December 1890: Adam Fields reported he was suffering from rheumatism, disease of the back and lungs as a result of measles. He said he contracted the disease while in the army and had suffered ever since. Upon examination, Dr. Prioleau found him to be 5-feet 8-inches, 146 lbs., and 50 years of age. His general appearance was good. Adam complained of pain in his chest and a cough. There was no evidence of lung disease with the respiratory murmur clear over both lungs. The heart sounds were normal. The doctor reported Adam was suffering from dyspepsia and indigestion. Adam also complained of piles but there were no external lesions or inflammation of the rectum. The doctor stated Adam suffered from general rheumatism but that there were no structural changes in the joints nor general contractions, etc.

A.P. Prioleau, M.D.

Summary of report of A.P. Prioleau, MD, 14 March 1893: Adam Fields was complaining of rheumatism, dyspepsia, shortness of breath and cough. Upon examination Dr. Prioleau found Adam to be 5-feet 9-inches, 147 lbs., and 57 years of age. There was no evidence of heart disease but there was evidence that Adam was suffering from asthma. There was labored and short respirations with prolonged expiration. Upon auscultation, there was evidence of labored breathing that could be heard at some distance. He had suffered from asthma for four years and the diseased appeared to be progressing. Adam admitted to suffering from dyspepsia but with the exception of constipation, no evidence of the disease could be found. The doctor stated that Adam was suffering from rheumatism with wasting of muscles in the gluteal region and changes in the spinous structure. There was no evidence of vicious habits. He was found to be entitled to a 10/18 rating for asthma and 6/18 for rheumatism.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 8 June 1897: He was a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment USC Infantry Volunteers. He was receiving a pension of $6 per month for rheumatism and dyspepsia. He stated his rheumatism and dyspepsia had greatly increased and he was also troubled with asthma and failing eyesight. He said he was unable to earn a living. When he felt his best, he said, he might do some light work for two or three hours. Also appearing were R.N. Wright and Josh Deas of Beaufort.

N.J. Kennedy

Summary of report of N.J. Kennedy, 30 March 1898: Adam Fields presented suffering with rheumatism, dyspepsia, asthma, impaired eyesight, severe cough, and disability from age. He was examined by N. Kennedy and found to be 57 years old, 5-feet 8-inches tall, and 185 lbs. Examination of the lungs showed him to have short, labored, inspiration and prolonged expiration. There were also audible rales. The respiratory murmur was feeble. He was rated for asthma at 10/18. The heart was feeble but the rhythm was regular and there were no murmurs or evidence of organic disease. His heart was rated at 4/18. Adam was suffering with rheumatism affecting his hips and knees. There was thickening of the fibrous structures, prominence of articulating bones, lameness, stiffness, and limitation of motion equal to a rating of ¼.  The rheumatism was rated at 8/18. Adam’s vision was 20/20. He had a scar on his penis and one in the left groin. Drs. W.H. Ellis, A.P. Prioleau, and N.J. Kennedy were present at the examination.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 4 May 1898: He was married to Louisa Fields (Louisa McCoy). They were married in 1867 at Ellis Plantation near Beaufort, SC by Rev. Woodworth. He reported he had three children living: Tony Fields who was born 23 October 1862 (deaf and dumb), Caroline who was born 29 March 1874, and Paul who was born 9 February 1878.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 22 June 1899: He was living at Ellis Plantation, Port Royal Island, Beaufort County, SC at the time of this statement. He lived at Jericho Plantation from 25 April 1865 until moving to Ellis Plantation. He was a farmer. He was married to Louisa Fields (Louisa McCoy) about 1868 at Ellis Plantation, Port Royal Island, Beaufort County, SC by  Dr. Woodruff. He had a marriage certificate. He was married previously to Diana who died at Binyard Plantation, Port Royal Island. At the time of his statement, he had two living children: Caroline Fields and Paul Fields.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 18 February 1901: He was receiving a pension because of disabilities incurred in the military. He had served as a private in Company F, 33rd USC Volunteer Infantry. He stated his rheumatism and dyspepsia had troubled him for years and that he was also disabled from the infirmities of old age. He lived in Jericho, Beaufort County, SC. He had suffered from asthma for the ten or twelve years before this statement, his eyesight was failing, and he was becoming hard of hearing. He was entirely unable to perform manual labor because of his shortness of breath and could not do a day’s work to save his life. Also appearing were Richard Days and Anthony Carter, both of Beaufort, SC.

N. Kennedy

Summary of report of N. Kennedy, 19 June 1901: Adam Fields reported he suffered with rheumatism, dyspepsia, senility, asthma, impaired sight and hearing, and diseases of the lungs and back. Upon examination, he was found to be 60 years of age, 5-feet 8-inches, 155 lbs., with black complexion and eyes, and gray hair. He had been a farmer. His lungs showed labored inspiration and short expiration with prolonged respiratory murmur. He suffered with asthma. The heart rhythm was regular. He was lame, stiff, and had wasting of the muscles in the gluteal region, thickening of the fibrous structures, and limitation of motion as evidence when he stooped and arose. He complained of dyspepsia. His tongue was coated and his bowels were constipated. There was no disease of the abdominal organs in evidence. There was no evidence of senility. There was also no evidence of deafness as he could hear ordinary conversation at or beyond six feet with either ear stopped. His vision was 15/20. He was unable to perform manual labor due to frequent asthma attacks. He was found to have a permanent disability for asthma not due to vicious habits. That disability warranted a rate of $12 per month. Drs. A.P. Prioleau, N.J. Kennedy, and S.B. Thompson were present for the examination.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 18 June 1902: He was with his company all the time and never on detached duty. He was discharged for disability in 1865, the doctor calling it chronic disease. He was a field hand before he enlisted. He lived in Beaufort County ever since the war ended. Nannie Baker and Martha Simmons were his neighbors. Bram Strobic and Antony Carter were two of his original witnesses. Frederick Fripp, of the same company in the army, was another witness. Adam was last examined in January 1889 for his legs and back. Mr. Crofut of Beaufort, SC was his attorney. He married his present wife in 1863. They had never been separated or divorced. He name was Louisa McCoy. She had never married before. He knew her as a child. He had no children under 14 years of age at the time of his statement.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields 18 June 1902: He was bon on Lady’s Island, Beaufort County, SC, the slave of Richard Runnels. He lived with him on a plantation in Beaufort County until freedom. Only one of his master’s family was living at the time of his statement. Paul Fields, his brother, lived there. His father was Tony Fields and his mother was Charlotte Fields. They both enslaved by Richard Runnels. Adam was named after his father. He had a brother named Paul Fields who served in Company C of the same regiment as Adam. Adam enlisted at Beaufort, SC in April 1862. He thought he was 20 but that was only a guess. I was not married at the time but was a full hand. He was in the army for a long time before Lincoln died. He was a private in Company F, 33rd USC Infantry. He had a naked examination at enlistment. He served for two years and 10 months. Sam Mack and Joe Richardson enlisted at the same time. Higgerson was his colonel. Strong was the major. Regimental Surgeon Rogers was his captain. Johnson was first lieutenant. Lt. White was second lieutenant. Willie Torkin was Ord. Sergeant, Isaac Jenkins and Tobie McKnight were his tent mates. The company organized at Beaufort and remained there about six months, then going to Folly Island, SC, and then to Savannah, GA. That was where he took sick and never joined his regiment again. He was only in the Battle of Honey Hill. Sergeant Hoppy was killed and one other was wounded. At Savannah, GA his legs began to swell and he had pain in his back and front. He was discharged. He did not go to the hospital but was treated in camp.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 24 December 1902: He was 65 years of age and a resident of Jericho, Beaufort County, SC. He was receiving a pension for $8 per month for rheumatism, asthma, and failing eyesight. He served as a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment, USCT. He enlisted on 23 April 1863 and was honorably discharged on 23 May 1865. Also appearing were Jacob McKee and Charles Seymour, both of Beaufort, SC.

Ralph M. Hanson, M.D.

Summary of report of Ralph M. Hanson, MD, 25 November 1903: Adam Fields was 67 years of age, 5-feet 8-inches tall, 168 lbs., with black complexion and eyes; and gray hair. He was a laborer. His muscles were soft but not flabby, his gait was steady, and his joints moved freely. He had some rales in his lungs but there was no evidence of further pulmonary [illegible]. Vision was 30/20 in both eyes. He had no problems hearing normal conversation with either ear from any point in the exam room. No evidence of rheumatism, disease of back, vicious habits or any other further disability were in evidence. He was considered permanently disabled for manual labor due to age and condition of his heart and lungs, not due to vicious habits, and recommended to receive $38 per month. Drs. M. Corbin, R.S. Reid, and Ralph M. Lawson performed the examination.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 4 May 1904: He was a resident of Ellis Plantation in Beaufort County, SC. He reported to be disabled because of rheumatism, failing eyesight, pain in the right shoulder, right leg and back. Also appearing were Richard Days and J.P Deveaux, both of Beaufort, SC.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 3 September 1904: He was 65 years old and a resident of Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC. He was receiving $8 per month for disability from pain in the back and legs. Also appearing were Frederick N. Christensen and N. Christensen, both of Beaufort, SC.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 25 March 1905: He was 62 years of age and had been a member of Company F, 33rd Regiment, USCT Volunteers. He was a resident of Ellis Place, Beaufort County, SC.He said he was born in 1842. Also appearing were Frank W. Garrett and N.W. Hayward, both of Beaufort, SC.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 15 February 1906: He was a member of Company F, 33rd Regiment USCT Volunteers. He was a resident of Bruton, Beaufort County, SC. His disabilities were rheumatism down his left side, failing eyesight, and pain in the back. He was born in 1835. Also appearing were N.W. Hayward and Mrs. S.A. Washington, both of Beaufort, SC. Mrs. Washington had known Adam for 35 years.

N.J. Kennedy, M.D.

Summary of report of Dr. N.J. Kennedy, 4 April 1906: Adam Fields complained of rheumatism, dyspepsia, asthma, affliction of the knee, disease of his back, lungs and impaired vision, and general and senile debility. He was born in Beaufort, SC and was 71 years of age. He was 5-feet 10-inches tall, weighed 165 lbs., with black complexion and eyes, and gray hair. He was a farmer. He was found to have labored breathing. His heart action was increased in force and frequency. He was dyspnea and palpitation but no edema or cyanosis. He was suffering with general rheumatism with lameness, stiffness, and wasting of muscle tissue in all of the joints. There was also limitation of joint motion. No contractures were in evidence. All of his joints were more or less affected. He also suffered with dyspepsia after eating and constipation of the liver and spleen. His back problems were deemed to have been due to rheumatism. His vision was 15/20 in each eye with some impairment due to age and arcus senilis in both eyes. He had general and senile debility due to the above. He was found to be disabled due to asthma, heart disease, rheumatism, dyspepsia, affliction of the eyes, enlarged prostate, general and senile debility and recommended to warrant a rate of $12 a month increase in pension. Drs. H.M. Stuart, C.M Griffin and N.J. Kennedy performed the examination.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 22 November 1906: He was receiving a pension of $10 per month for partial disability. He reported having chronic rheumatism, heart disease, [illegible], vertigo, asthma, [illegible] trouble, cough, [illegible] trouble, and impaired vision. Also appearing was March Washington who had known Adam for 20 years.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 12 Feb 1907: He was 68 years of age and living in Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC. He enlisted in 1862 and served as a private in Company F, 33rd USCT during the Civil War. He was discharged at Savannah, GA in May 1865. Also appearing was Peter Pinckney of Beaufort, SC who had known Adam Fields for 30 years.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 28 August 1908: He was 74 years old and living in Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC. He enlisted on 22 April 1863 as a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment US Colored Infantry Volunteers. He served until he was honorably discharged on 25 April 1865 in Savannah, GA. He was 5-feet 10-inches tall with dark eyes, complexion, and hair. He stated he was born a slave in 1834 at Beaufort, SC.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 5 October 1909: He was 70 years old and a resident of Jericho, Beaufort County, SC. He was a private in Company F, 33rd USC Troops Volunteers. He was honorably discharged at Savannah, GA in 1865. He stated he worked as a field hand and was born in 1839 at Ladies [sic] Island, Beaufort County, SC.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 29 January 1910: He was a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment USC Troops. He said he was 24 years of age at enlistment and there was no public record of his baptism or church. All of his family records were lost in a fire and there were no publics records of births, baptisms, or deaths in Beaufort County before the war or since. He said the most available proof of his age is on his enlistment papers. He swore the was 72 years old when he executed his claim for a pension in 1908.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 16 May 1910: He was 70 years of age and a resident of Jericho, Beaufort Township, Beaufort County, SC. He enlisted on 22 April 1863 in Company F, 33rd Regiment USC Volunteers and was honorably discharged at Savannah, GA on 25 April 1865 by reason of disability. He swore he was 23 years old when he enlisted. He was 5-feet 7-inches with dark complexion, eyes, and hair. He was a laborer who was born in 1840 at Beaufort, SC.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 18 May 1912: He was 73 years of age, a resident of Jericho, Beaufort County, SC. He enlisted on 22 April 1862 as a private in Company F, 33rd USCT Volunteer Infantry. He was honorably discharged in Savannah, GA on 5 May 1865 on account of his disability that occurred while in line of duty. He was, at that time, unable to use his limbs. He was born in 1839 at Ladies [sic[ Island, SC.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 27 February 1913: He was 77 years old and a resident of Broad River, Beaufort County, SC. He enlisted on 25 April 1863 as a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment, USC Troops Volunteers. He served in the Civil War and was honorably discharged at Savannah, GA on 22 May 1865 for disabilities: pain in the back and knees, ankle bones, left hand, and shoulder. He was 5-feet 6-inches tall, a farmer, and his eyes and hair were black. He was born in 1836 at Beaufort, SC. He stated he could not get around because of his disabilities and he had no adequate means of support.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 28 August 1913: He enlisted on 27 April 1863 as a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment. He was honorably discharged at Savannah, GA on 27 April 1865 because of his disability that occurred in the line of duty. He was 5-feet 7-inches tall; his eyes, complexion, and hair were dark; and his occupation was that of a farmer. He was born in 1839 at Ladies [sic] Island, Beaufort County, SC. He stated that at enlistment he was a sound man but was, at the time of his statement, suffering from rheumatism in both knees and asthma.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 14 October 1913: He was in the service from 1 April 1862 to 27 May 1865 as a private in Company F and also Company B, 33rd Regiment. He was honorably discharged at Savannah, GA for disabilities on 27 May 1865. He was receiving $23 per month. He was born in 1838 at Beaufort, SC. He was married to Louisa McCoy in November 1868 by Rev. Sanders at Ellis, SC. He was born in March 1838 and did not know when Louisa was born. There were no records of the marriage.

Neither of them had been previously married. He was discharged for disabilities at Savannah, GA after serving in Company B, 33rd Regiment and Company F, 33rd Regiment. He continued to suffer from rheumatism at the time of his statement.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 2 December 1913: He was 73 years old, a resident of Ellis, Beaufort County, SC. He enrolled in the army at Hilton Head, SC on 19 October 1862. He served as a private in Company B, 33rd Regiment. He re-enlisted on 22 April 1863 in Company F, 33rd Regiment. He was discharged at Savannah, GA on 25 April 1865 for disability. He was 5-feet 7-inches tall with dark complexion, eyes, and hair. His occupation was that of a farmer. He was born in 1840 at Beaufort, SC. After his discharge, he lived in Ellis, Beaufort County, SC.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 13 April 1914: He was 74 years old, a resident of Rhett, Beaufort County, SC. He enlisted in the army on 25 April 1862 as a private and served in Company F, 33rd USC Troops. He was honorably discharged at Savannah, GA on 5 May 1865 for disability. He was not in the military or navy before 1863 and not after May 1865. He was born on 1 January 1850 at Ladies [sic] Island, SC. He was 5-feet 5 inches tall with dark complexion, hair, and eyes. While on picket guard duty on or about February 1865, he became unable to do anything. He was discharged for disability. Also appearing were W.H. Shepherd and Nettie Killingsworth, both of Beaufort, who had known Adam for 40 and 10 years respectively.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 2 May 1914: He served as a private in Company F, 33rd USCT Volunteers. He enlisted in 1862 at Hilton Head, SC in October. He served until May 1865. He first felt rheumatism at Folly Island, SC in 1864. Also, his right knee was not fit for him to walk a quarter mile. He was treated by Dr. Hawk at Folly Island, SC. He, at the time of his statement, said he could not walk and was suffering with excruciating pain from time to time. He said he was unable to do manual labor because of his disabilities and that he was a sound man when he enlisted.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 9 May 1914: He was a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment, USCT Volunteers. He enlisted in April 1862 in Company B, 33rd Regiment and served for three months. He then re-enlisted in 1863 and served until he was discharged in May 1865 at Savannah, GA. He was discharged for disability in May 1865. He contracted rheumatism in the right knee while in the line of duty. He first felt it at Morris Island, SC about November 1864. He was treated by Dr. Hawk in Savannah, GA in 1864. He was, at the time of this statement, suffering with the same disability and was unable to walk. He eyes were impaired and he could not do manual labor.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 6 June 1914: He said he was discharged from the army in May 1865 at Savannah, GA. He said his disabilities were not due to the results of any vicious habits and the on account of his age and disabilities, he was entitled to an increase in his benefits. He said he suffered from the same disabilities but they were getting much worse. He said he, at the time of his statement, had pain in both eyes to the point he could hardly see. His rheumatism was much worse and the pain in his back made it hard for him to get around.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 6 October 1914: He was 76 years of age and a resident of Broad River, Beaufort County, SC. He was the same person who enlisted under the name of Adam Fields on 19 October 1862 in U.S. Colored Troops and was honorably discharged on 10 May 1865. He served from October 1862 until 1865 in the infantry. He was 5-feet 6-inches tall with dark complexion, eyes, and hair. His occupation was that of a farmer. He was born in 1838 at Beaufort, SC. He was discharged from the army for disability at Beaufort, SC.

Adam Fields

Summary of statement of Adam Fields, 3 April 1915: He was born about 1840 on Ladies [sic] Island, Beaufort County, SC. He served first in Company B, 33rd in 1862, and then with Company F, 33rd in 1863, being discharged in 1865. He was married to Louisa Fields. He maiden name was McCoy. They were married by Rev. Conant of Beaufort, SC about 30 November 1861. He was not married previously nor was he ever divorced. Louisa was not married previously. He was living with Louisa at the time of his statement and said she was very sick. Their children were: Tony Fields, born about 1869, dead; Louisa Fields, born about 1872, dead; Caroline Fields, born about 1874 living [at the time of the statement]; Paul Fields, born about 1878, living [at the time of the statement].

 

Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

Declaration of Adam Fields, Pension File of Adam Fields, Company F, 33rd USCT, Certificate number 525489.

 

Louisa Fields

Summary of statement of Louisa Fields: 25 September 1916: Adam Fields died on 3 September 1916. She was married to Adam in 1886 in Beaufort. Her name before marriage was Louisa McLevy. Also present were Laer Frazer and India G. Legare who saw Louisa sign her name. Laer had been Louisa’s neighbor for life and India for ten years.

Louisa Fields

Summary of statement of Louisa Fields, 25 September 1916: Louisa was 75 years old and a resident of Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC. She was the widow of Adam Fields who enlisted on 22 April 1863 as a private in Company F, 33rd Regiment, US Colored Infantry Volunteers. He was honorably discharged 25 April 1865 having served 90 days or more. She was married under the name of Louisa McCoy at Beaufort in 1866 by Rev. Woodruff. Neither Adam nor Louisa had been previously married. Adam died 3 September 1916 at Charleston. They were never divorced and she had not remarried since Adam’s death. Also present were Marcus Polite and Caroline Fields of Beaufort, SC. They knew Louisa for 45 and 42 years respectively.

Louisa Fields

Summary of statement of Louisa Fields, 14 October 1916: She was the widow of Adam Fields, late of Company F, 33rd Regiment, USC Infantry. She was married to Adam on 17 March 1893 by Rev. E. Sanders. They lived continuously as husband and wife until his death. He was buried in the National Cemetery of Beaufort, SC in September 1916 having died at Roper Hospital in Charleston, SC. He had gone there for treatment a few days prior to his death.

Toby Fields

Summary of statement of Toby Fields, 10 October 1916: Toby was 66 years old and had been associated with both Adam and Louisa Fields. He knew Louisa since she was a child and knew that neither of them had been married before marrying each other. Louisa and A lived together as man and wife until Adam Fields died in Charleston, SC in September 1916. He also know that Louisa had not remarried after the death of Adam.

Rosa Coleman

Summary of statement of Rosa Coleman, 14 October 1916: She was a resident of Beaufort, SC and knew both Louisa and Adam Fields since childhood. She knew neither of them had been married before their marriage to each other. She attended the funeral services for Adam Fields at the National Cemetery in Beaufort, SC in September 1916.

Ella Baker

Summary of statement of Ella Baker, [not completed] 1917: She was a neighbor and friend of Louisa and Adam Fields since her early childhood. Neither of them had been previously married. They were married on 17 March 1893 at Ellis Plantation near what was then known as Burton, SC in Beaufort County.

The Rev. E. Sanders performed the ceremony. They lived together continuously until Adam Fields died. Louis had not remarried after the death of her husband.

Jerry Simmons

Summary of statement of Jerry Simmons, [not completed] 1917: He was a neighbor of Adam Fields and his wife, Louisa, since childhood. He was well acquainted with both of them. He was present at their marriage on 17 March 1893 at Ellis Plantation and knew the ceremony was performed by Rev. E. Sanders near what was then known as Burton, SC. Jerry knew neither Adam nor Louisa had been previously married and that Louisa had not remarried after Adam’s death.

Related Records

Freedman’s Bank Record, Paul Fields

Adam Fields’ brother Paul Fields, who also served in the 33rd United States Colored Troops, opened an account with the Freedman’s Savings and Trust (Freedman’s Bank). In his account record, he lists Toby and Charlotte Fields as parents and lists siblings as Daniel, Adam, Tobey, James, William, Bram, Jane and Maria.

 

Fields Paul Freedman's Bank Record, Beaufort, SC

“United States, Freedman’s Bank Records, 1865-1874,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6SN3-WY4?cc=1417695&wc=3MDR-L2S%3A1551794803%2C1551794801 : 5 February 2015), Beaufort, South Carolina > Roll 20, June 20, 1868-July 3, 1874, accounts 2732-5989 > image 33 of 684; citing NARA microfilm publication M816 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1970).

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