The International African American Museum’s
Center for Family History is a one of a kind research
center with a special focus on African American
genealogy at one of our country’s most sacred sites.

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CENTER FOR FAMILY HISTORY BLOG

Genealogist Robin Foster shares research tips and keeps you up to date with what’s happening at the IAAM Center for Family History.

LEARN RESEARCH SKILLS

Our On Demand Learning Library will help you build your research skills and keep your research moving forward.

PRESERVATION EFFORTS

Learn about efforts to preserve African American community and family history.

EXPLORE RECORDS

View our growing collections of funeral programs, obituaries, photos, historical documents and family histories.

FEATURED ARTICLES

Learn from the experts! View guest posts written by experts in the field of African American genealogy.

CFH IN THE COMMUNITY

See what we’ve been up to. Learn about upcoming community events.

CONTRIBUTE PHOTOS OR DOCUMENTS

Would you like to contribute funeral programs, obituaries, photos, historical documents or family histories to our collections? Here’s what you need to know to get started on preserving your family’s history at IAAM!

GENEALOGY FOR KIDS AND YOUTH

Ideas for inspiring young family historians.

VIDEO GALLERY

View featured videos. Ramp up your research skills with video tutorials. Learn more about the rich Gullah Geechee cultural heritage of the Lowcountry. Our video gallery has lots to sink your teeth into. View on any of your devices!

CONTRIBUTE AN ANCESTOR PHOTO OR DOCUMENT

Would you like to contribute Bible records, funeral programs, obituaries, photos, historical documents or family histories to our digital collections? We will cherish your contributions. Here’s what you need to know to get started on preserving your family’s history at IAAM!

 

LATEST BLOG POSTS

US, South Carolina, Charleston–Birth Registers, 1901–1926

US, South Carolina, Charleston–Birth Registers, 1901–1926

How wonderful to have this primary resource for your ancestor. These birth registers give the names of their parents. So, you do not to need to rely on the death record of your ancestor as the main source for this information. 1901-1926 is rather late, and most would consider the information would be known by descendants. If you consider that enslavement ended only in 1865, many of these records represent the first generation or second generation born outside of enslavement. South Carolina, Charleston County, Charleston, Birth Registers, 1901-1926 can assist many African Americans who are unsure about the parentage of their ancestor born between 1901 and 1926.

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Oklahoma, School Records, 1895-1936

Oklahoma, School Records, 1895-1936

Today’s featured collection is Oklahoma School Records 1895 – 1936. This particular collection holds school census records as well as rosters for the counties that existed before and after Oklahoma statehood, which occurred in 1907. This collection is significant because it reflects the two territories: Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory. After 1907, the new state of Oklahoma is reflected with all of the new counties. For more about this collection one can visit the Family Search website to Learn More about this collection.

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Virginia Funeral Programs

Virginia Funeral Programs

The first bit of advice we give to everyone who’s thinking of starting their ancestor research is “Find the person in your family who collects the funeral programs.” Why? Because Homegoing programs celebrate a person’s life within their circle of loved ones, and most every loved one is mentioned in the funeral program.

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Finding Documentation for Your Ancestor’s Timeline

Finding Documentation for Your Ancestor’s Timeline

The Log Hut in Elbert County, Georgia, on the plantation of Thomas Jones, where Bishop Heard was born. June 25, 1850, Heard: From Slavery to the Bishopric, 1969, Arno Press, Inc. Now, we will take the timeline from the blog, Bishop William H. Heard’s (1850-1937)...

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