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Perkins, James. USCT Pension File Abstract, K 35th USCT, Round O and Jacksonboro, SC

Biographical Summary

James Perkins was born about 12 June 1840 at or near Pactolus, NC. His mother was Flora Perkins. His siblings were Lucy, born 1 February 1850; Gracey, born 5 September 1853; Sam, born 15 October 1855; and David, born 27 May 1858.

The story of James Perkins’ service in the United States Colored Troops is remarkable. He was wounded and taken prisoner at the Battle of Olustee, Florida 20 Feb 1864 and taken to Andersonville, GA. He was later exchanged at Wilmington, NC and sent to Annapolis Hospital. He was then furloughed to New Bern, NC and then to Alexandria, Fortress Monroe, Brazos Island, New Orleans, Bedlow Island, Charleston, and Walterboro, South Carolina.

After the war, he settled in Colleton County, SC, first settling in Walterboro, then Jacksonboro. James married Betsey Singleton about 1 March 1868. He died 20 May 1925 at Round O, Colleton County, SC.

We previously wrote about James Perkins on the Lowcountry Africana website when we discovered a handwritten letter by him in Freedmen’s Bureau records. Please see the post “Letter Written by Freedman James Perkins, Jacksonboro, SC, 1870.”

USCT Service

James Perkins served as a private in Company K, 35th US Colored Infantry.

Summary of Compiled Civil War Service record, 23 February 1875: James Perkins, a private in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops, mustered into the service on 30 July 1863 at New Bern, NC. He was on Muster Rolls for Company K from organization to 31 December 1863. He was reported present for duty for January and February 1864; 29 February to 30 June, he was reported missing since the battle of Olustee, FL; his name was dropped from the rolls from 20 February 1864 to 30 April 1865; May and June 1865 showed him taken up from missing in action Battle of Olustee, FL 20 February 1864; to Camp Parole Prisoners Annapolis, MD July and August; present for duty 31 August to 30 April 1866. He was present and mustered out with the company at Charleston, SC 1 June 1866.

Status of Pension Application

Summary of Brief for Arrears of Invalid Pension, 24 June 1880: James Perkins was living at Walterboro, Colleton County, SC. He was discharged from service on 1 June 1866. He first received a pension 16 July 1874 at the rate of $4 per month.

James Perkins was pensioned at $4 commencing 16 July 1874, $6 per month commencing 14 January 1877, $8 per month beginning 20 August 1884, and $10 per month beginning 3 October 1888. He began receiving $19 per month on 20 June 1912, $25 commencing 12 June 1913, and $30 on 12 June 1918. After his death, his widow Betsey was pensioned at $30 per month, commencing 6 June 1925.

Summary of Testimony

James Perkins

Summary of letter from James Perkins, 6 February 1912: He stated he was in the Civil War for three years from 1863 to 1866. He was born 12 June 1840.

A.G. Gatch

Summary of letter from A.G. Gatch, Local Registrar, 25 May 1925: He stated he was asked by Charles Perkins to notify the Bureau of Pensions about the death of his father, James Perkins. James died on 20 May 1920 at 9:30 PM. He left his wife, Betsey Perkins, his only heir and dependent.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 14 June 1912: James Perkins was 72-years old at the time of his statement. He stated he was enrolled on 25 May 1863 and served as a private in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops. He was discharged at Charleston on 1 June 1866. At enlistment he was described as follows: 5-feet 3-1/2 inches tall with dark hair, eyes, and complexion, occupation farmer, and he was born 12 June 1840 at Pactolus, NC. After leaving the service, he lived at Round O, SC.

Gracey Perkins

Summary of letter from James Perkins’ sister Gracey, 22 April 1912: She listed his siblings as follows: Lucy, born 1 February 1850; James born 12 June 1840; Gracey, born 5 September 1853; Sam, born 15 October 1855; and David, born 27 May 1858.

 

Letter Grady Perkins to James Perkins

 

Letter Grady Perkins to James Perkins

 

James Perkins

Summary of letter to Commissioner of Pensions from James Perkins, 1 April 1913: His mother was Flora Perkins. He stated his mother told him he was 10 years older than his sister, Lucy. He said he was born 12 June 1840 in Pitts County, NC. He states “My Mrstress Mary Perkins had give these ages to my mother.”

 

Letter James Perkins to Pension Board

 

James Perkins

Summary of letter to Commissioner of Pensions from James Perkins, 31 May 1912: He stated he served for three years during the Civil War. He enlisted at New Bern, NC on 25 May 1863 and was discharged 1 June 1866 at Charleston, SC. James stated he was wounded and taken prisoner at the Battle of Olustee, FL on 20 February 1864. He said he was born 12 June 1840 in Pitts County, NC about seven miles from Pactolus, NC.

 

 
Letter from James Perkins to Pension Bureau
 

Richard Hansley

Summary of statement of Richard Hansley, 29 September 1900: James Perkins was a private in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops. He was discharged at Charleston, SC about 1 June 1866. While in the line of duty at New Bern, NC about 4 July 1863, he was wounded while shooting at target practice. A piece of the gun cap struck him in the right eye. While at Folly Island, SC he was injured about 13 November 1863. He was run over by Sgt. Kato McClenny and had his right arm dislocated at the shoulder. Three days later, he was attended to by Dr. Grass. Richard was a member of the same company as James and was present as an eyewitness to the above facts.

Benjamin Powell

Summary of statement of Benjamin Powell, 27 August 1900: James Perkins’ right eye was injured by a gun cap while shooting at target practice under Capt. James Armstrong. James lived near Benjamin so Benjamin knew James was suffering from the results of the said injury. James was also run over by Sgt. Cato McClenny at Folly Island, SC. His shoulder was knocked out of place and, three days later, he was attended to by Dr. Grass and Dr. Marshall. At the time of his statement, Benjamin knew James suffered from his injuries and was unable to do manual labor.

David King

Summary of statement of David King, 27 August 1900: David knew James had been injured while shooting at targets under the command of Capt. James Armstrong. He was hit in the eye by a gun cap. David also knew James was injured when he was run over by Sgt. Cato McCloney. His shoulder was knocked out of place and Dr. Grass attended him. David lived near James at the time of the statement and knew personally that James suffered from his injuries to the point where he could not do manual labor.

Rhoden Latham

Summary of statement of Rhoden Latham, 4 August 1900: Rhoden stated James Perkins had been a private in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops. He knew he was discharged in Charleston, SC about 1 June 1866. Rhoden stated that James had his arm dislocated when he was run over in the night by Sgt. Cato McClenny and, while on general review in the line of duty, James suffered from heart trouble. He was shot through the right thigh on 20 February 1864 at Olusta, FL and was taken prisoner. Rhoden was present and saw the above events happen because he was in the same command as was James Perkins.

Physician’s Statement

Summary of Physician’s Affidavit, 4 July 1900: Upon examination, James Perkins was found to have had a gunshot wound in the right thigh. He had contraction of the muscles of his right arm which was very painful. He was also affected with valvular disease of the heart.

Ben Powell

Summary of statement of Ben Powell, 5 May 1900: He stated James Perkins was wounded when he fell while on duty near Folly Island, SC. He was taken by his comrades to camp. Ben had been in the same company and regiment as was James.

Daniel Hill

Summary of statement of Daniel Hill, 7 June 1900: He knew James Perkins had served as a private in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops. While in the line of duty near Folly Island, SC, James fell while on general review. He had to be carried to his tent and Dr. Grass attended him. It was said to be heart trouble. Daniel served in the same company and regiment with James.

C.P. Chisolm and Smart Hambleton

Summary of statements of C.P. Chisolm and Smart Hambleton, 10 October 1900: They knew James Perkins suffered from heart disease, an affected eye, right arm and right shoulder trouble. They were with James and knew him to complain from these conditions. They lived about a mile from him and saw him constantly every week and often every day.

William Washington and Charles Blake

Summary of statements of William Washington and Charles Blake, 10 December 1900: They knew James Perkins for 39 and 36 years respectively. They knew him to complain of pain in his right eye, right arm, right shoulder, and the heart. They knew he was unable to do hard work. They lived near James and saw him frequently. They were also acquainted with Dr. Rivers and Dr. Wetsell who had treated him.

Smart Hambleton and Henryetta Dawson

Summary of statements of Smart Hambleton and Henryetta Dawson, 24 February 1900: They had known James Perkins for 32 years. They knew that during the period of 1 December 1897 to 1 February 1899 James was affected with shortness of breath, fluttering of the heart, pain in his back and limbs, and cramps in his hands. They lived within one-quarter mile of James.

J.D. Drayton

Summary of statement of J.D. Drayton, 25 February 1899: He had known James Perkins for 20 years or more and saw him very often. He knew James to complain of and be troubled by his right eye, dislocation of his right shoulder, and the wound in his right thigh.

 

J.D. Drayton Testimony

 

D.W. Robinson

Summary of statement of D.W. Robinson, 25 February 1899: He had known James Perkins for 25 years and saw him quite often. He knew James complained of problems with his right eye, his right shoulder, and a wound in his right thigh.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 18 August 1900: He said that while near New Bern, NC on 4 July 1863, he was injured in the right eye by a gun cap that struck him. He was shooting at the target. After it happened, he put cold water on his eye. While at Folly Island, NC about 10 August 1863 he was afflicted with pain in his right eye and head that was so bad he could not walk or look at the sun. Dr. Grass attended him. He was in the hospital at New Bern, NC under Dr. Collman in March, April, and May 1863 after he left Andersonville Prison in Georgia. He received an injury to his right arm and shoulder when Sgt. Kato McCloney ran over him. It knocked his shoulder out of place and, three days later, James was treated by Dr. Grass, Dr. Steward, and Dr. Marshall. He said Dr. Grass told him to sit on a stool and to give him his hand. The doctor took hold of his hand and James fell as “…a dead man.” He, at the time of his statement, stated he had pain in his arm and shoulder and was unable to do any manual labor at all. At times he was laid up in bed.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 24 February 1900: While drilling in Folly Island, SC he was taken up and carried to camps by his comrades. Dr. Grass tended him. In 1864, while a prisoner at Andersonville, GA he was very sick with heart trouble. In 1867 in Walterboro, SC he was again down for three months, sick with the heart trouble. In May 1899, he was affected with lameness.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 26 November 1897: He stated he enrolled in the army about 1 June 1863. He was discharged at Charleston, SC about 1 June 1866. He stated he was unable to manual labor due to debility from age, an injury to his right eye, a right arm and shoulder injury, and a gunshot wound of his right thigh.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 12 July 1895: He served in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops. He stated he was an invalid and unable to do manual labor because of being crippled in his right leg, suffering from rheumatism of his right shoulder, and his right eye. He stated he was frostbitten about November 1863. He was captured and put in the Confederate prison at Andersonville, GA in 1864.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 22 September 1906: He stated he enrolled on 1 June 1863 in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops. He was honorably discharged 1 June 1866 at Charleston, SC. At the time of his statement, he said he could not earn support by manual labor because of an injury to his right eye, an injury to his right arm and shoulder, a wound of the right thigh, rheumatism, heart disease, and debility due to age.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 7 July 1900: He stated he was unable to earn support because of a gunshot wound to his right thigh, injury to his right eye, injury to his right arm and shoulder, and heart disease.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 29 November 1900: He was disabled because of a gunshot wound to his right thigh. He also suffered from an injury to his right eye, right arm, and resulting rheumatism.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 30 March 1907: He was a resident of Jacksonboro, Colleton County, SC. He stated he served only as a laborer while in the service from 1 June 1863 to 1 June 1866. At enlistment, he was 5-feet 3-1/2 inches tall with dark complexion, hair, and eyes. After leaving the service, he lived first at Walterboro, SC and then at Jacksonboro, SC in 1867.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 13 July 1874: Betty Singleton was married to James Perkins on 1 March 1868. On 24 February 1864, James was wounded at the Battle of Ocean Pond in the right hip. He was taken prisoner to Andersonville, GA. He was exchanged at Wilmington, NC and sent to Annapolis Hospital. He was then furloughed to New Bern, NC and then to Alexandria, Fortress Monroe, Brazos Island, New Orleans, Bedlow Island, Charleston, and Walterboro. He found his regiment at Walterboro. After leaving the service, he resided in Colleton County, SC and worked as a stage driver and farmer.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 3 October 1883: He stated he enrolled for a pension because of breaking of the hip incurred while a private in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops. He stated the wound had become more painful and disabled him more and more every day. He stated he was unable to do a full day’s work.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 28 October 1887: He was disabled because of a gunshot wound in the right thigh incurred while in the service. He stated he could only do light labor because of the pain. The bullet entered the groin about two inches from the hip joint. It fractured the bones. He had pain in his groin and thigh, his leg ached and hurt him when the weather changed. While sitting or lying down, the leg became stiff and painful. Then, upon rising, it would take him about an hour of limping about and putting liniment on it before he could walk.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 17 November 1874: James stated he was wounded in his right hip in the Battle of Olustee or Ocean Pond, FL on 20 February 1864. He was taken prisoner that night and carried to Lake City, FL. From there, he was taken to Tallahassee and then to Macon, GA. He was finally taken to Andersonville Prison. From there, he was taken to Wilmington, NC where he was paroled. He was sent to Annapolis, MD where he entered the US General Hospital and stayed about one month. He was furloughed to New Berne, NC and went into the hospital there in May 1865. Dr. Coleman was the hospital surgeon who attended James. James remained there about two months, April and May 1865. From there he was sent to Fortress Monroe where he was in the hospital or convalescent camp.

From there, he went to Norfolk and then to Brazos Island, TX with the 5th Massachusetts Colored Cavalry. He was disabled and was sent to New Orleans, then to New York City, NY on Broome Street where he was in a convalescent hospital. He went to Bedloe’s Island from New York, then to Hilton Head, and then to Charleston where he met up with his regiment. After being wounded, he never did any duty.

Charles Brock and Leroy Gibbs

Summary of statements of Charles Brock and Leroy Gibbs, 17 November 1874: They had been acquainted with James Perkins for 11 years.

James Perkins

Summary of letter from James Perkins, [undated]: He stated he enlisted 1 June 1863 to 20 February 1864. He was taken prisoner at the Battle of Olustee or Ocean Pond, FL and was a prisoner in Andersonville Prison, GA. About 4 March 1865, he was paroled or exchanged at Willton [Wilmington], NC. He had a furlough home to New Bern, NC. He was sick in the hospital with his eye and head being so bad he could not see. Dr. Collman attended him about 15 April 1865. He was sent to Walterboro, SC 13 October 1865 and put on light duty. He was discharged 1 June 1866 at Charleston, SC.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, [undated]: He was attended by the regimental doctor on Folly Island, SC, Dr. Grass and Dr. Marshall. He was in the regimental hospital there. He was not fit for duty for some time. As soon as he was fit, the regiment was sent to Jacksonville, FL. In 1864, he was taken prisoner at the Battle of Olustee or Ocean Pond, FL. His right eyesight was bad about 4 July 1863.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 9 January 1889: He injured his right eye about 4 July 1863 at New Bern, NC. He injured his right arm about 13 November 1863 near Folly Island, SC. The injury to the arm resulted in rheumatism that first appeared about 1864 while he was imprisoned at Andersonville, GA.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 30 April 1889: He stated his right arm was knocked out of place at the shoulder about 13 November 1863 at Folly Island, SC. He was in the regimental hospital and treated by Dr. Grass.

James Perkins

Summary of letter from James Perkins, 4 June 1889: After discharge, James stated he was first treated by Dr. George Rivers in Walterboro, SC about July 1866. In 1867, he lived with Dr. C.J. Printess from 8 January to December 1867. Dr. Printess treated his eye and his rheumatism. In 1890, James lived in Walterboro and Dr. George Rivers treated him for rheumatism. He then moved to Round O, SC and Dr. Printess was again his doctor, treating him for his eye and arm until 1884. He was treated in New York, NY for his eye. He obtained a bottle of oil from H.W. Durant at Cottage Village, SC in 1887 and used that for his rheumatism.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 29 May 1876: He stated he was never in the naval service. He was a member of Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Infantry. He had not served in the US service since being discharged 1 June 1866.

James Perkins

Summary of letter from James Perkins, [undated]: He was a private in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops from 3 June 1863 to 3 June 1866. He was injured in his right arm about 13 November 1863. His eye was injured by a gun cap in July 1863.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 26 February 1891: He received an injury to his right eye while in the line of duty at target drill on 4 July 1863 at New Bern, NC. He also injured his right arm when he was run over by Sgt. Cato McClearney in the dark while James was going to his tent. It happened at Folly Island, SC. Dr. Grass and Dr. Marshall attended him on 13 November 1863. Dr. Coals treated him at New Bern, NC in 1865 after James was released from prison.

Surgeon General’s Office

Summary of Surgeon General’s Office form, 6 May 1875: James Perkins was admitted to Foster General Hospital, New Bern, NC on 30 March 1865 from quarters for treatment for Intermittent Fever Quotidian and returned to duty 19 May 1865.

Merick Sykes

Summary of statement of Merick Sykes, 16 November 1874: He served as a private in the same company and regiment as did James Perkins. Merick was at the Battle of Olustee or Ocean Pond, FL on 20 February 1864. He was present when James Perkins was shot and he, with Benjamin West and Edward George, carried James off the battle field by direction of Capt. Armstrong. They carried him to an ambulance. That night, James was taken prisoner and Merick did not see James again until he returned to the company a few weeks before they were disbanded.

Leroy Gibbs

Summary of statement of Leroy Gibbs, 16 November 1874: He was well acquainted with James Perkins and knew he had been a private in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops. He knew James was present at the Battle of Olustee, FL and Leroy saw James directly after he was shot down. He saw James carried off the field to the ambulance. The following day, he heard that James, with all of the others who were wounded at the battle, were taken prisoner. James returned to the company shortly before they were discharged.

Charles Brock

Summary of statement of Charles Brock, 16 November 1874: He served in the same company and regiment as did James Perkins. He never saw James after the Battle of Olustee or Ocean Pond, FL. He saw him after James returned to the company shortly before they were discharged.

Charles B. Brock

Summary of statement of Charles B. Brock, 20 October 1875: He served in the same company and regiment as did James Perkins. He saw James get wounded at the Battle of Olustee. He was wounded in the right hip. James was “…about two files…” from him to his left. He knew James had been taken prisoner that same day. When James returned to the company, he was a cripple from the wound.

Merick Sykes

Summary of statement of Merick Sykes, 20 October 1875: He served in the same company and regiment as did James Perkins. He knew James was wounded at the Battle of Olustee, FL on 20 February 1864. He was wounded in the right hip and Merick helped take James up from the ground where he had fallen. He was carried to the ambulance and taken prisoner that night. When James returned to the company, he was a cripple.

Charles Bruck

Summary of statement of Charles Bruck, 8 March 1889: He was a tent mate of James Perkins when they were in the army. He was in the same company and regiment as was James. Charles knew James was injured in the right eye by a gun cap at New Bern, NC about 4 July 1863. He also knew James’ right arm was knocked out of place from the right shoulder. He was attended by Dr. Marshall and Dr. Grass who were the regimental doctors. They were on Folly Island, SC when the injury happened. The injury to James’ arm happened about 13 November 1863. James was taken prisoner at the Battle of Olustee, FL. Charles did not see James for about 18 months. James Armstrong was the captain of their company and James C. Beecher was the colonel of their regiment.

S.O. Greene

Summary of Physician’s Affidavit, 4 June 1889: S.O. Greene stated he knew James Perkins for a number of years. He knew James had been an invalid and under medical treatment by Drs. Rivers, Prentiss, and others. William Edwards stated he had been acquainted with James Perkins for over 23 years. He knew Dr. Prentiss and Dr. Rivers had treated him.

Benjamin Powell

Summary of statement of Benjamin Powell, 7 March 1889: He saw James Perkins injury happen on 4 July 1863 at New Bern, NC. He also saw the injury to James’ right arm occur at Folly Island, SC about 13 November 1863. Benjamin and James were raised in the same neighborhood and, during the war, belonged to the same company.

Benjamin Powell

Summary of statement of Benjamin Powell, 18 June 1889: He knew James Perkins was affected in his right eye and right arm. Both injuries occurred during the war in 1863. Benjamin stated that James Armstrong was the captain of their company. James Perkins’ eye injury occurred when he was struck by a gun cap at New Bern, NC in 1863. His right arm was knocked out of place on Folly Island, SC in November 1863. Benjamin knew James had bought medicine for his rheumatism for the 15 years prior to this statement and Benjamin had purchased some for James as well.

J.E. Rivers

Summary of statement of J.E. Rivers, 31 May 1889: He stated he had sold pain medicine and liniment to James Perkins from 1885 to 1887. The six bottles of pain medicine were 50-cents each. He had also sold five bottles of liniment to James at $1.25.

D.H. Miller, M.D.

Summary of statement of Dr. W.H. Miller, 4 June 1889: He had examined and treated James Perkins during the year 1889. He was suffering from a cataract growing in his right eye. The doctor believed it was incurable except by an operation.

Jacob Scriven

Summary of statement of Jacob Scriven, 22 June 1889: He knew James Perkins beginning in early 1867. James was seriously afflicted in his right eye and right arm.

John Butler

Summary of statement of John Butler, 22 June 1889: He knew James Perkins for more than 20 years and stated he was afflicted with rheumatism, a useless arm, and serious right eye problems.

Smart Hamilton

Summary of statement of Smart Hamilton, 22 June 1889: He knew James Perkins for at least 25 years. During that time, he knew James suffered with a rheumatic arm and defective eye.

Charles Bruck

Summary of statement of Charles Bruck, 11 February 1891: He stated James Perkins was his tent mate. In 1863, at New Bern, NC, James’ right eye was injured when a gun cap struck him there. Charles stated James was discharging his gun on a practice drill. He also knew that James was run over about November 1863 by one of the men of the company. He dislocated his right shoulder and was treated by the regimental doctors, Dr. Grass and Dr. [Illegible].

Charles Brock

Summary of letter from Charles Brock, 9 May 1892: He stated James Perkins was his tent mate up to the time he was taken prisoner. He was injured in the line of duty when a gun cap or piece of one struck him in the right eye. Charles remembered that James had also injured his right arm by dislocating his shoulder.

Smart Hamilton

Summary of statement of Smart Hamilton, 13 July 1894: Smart knew James Perkins had injured his hip when he was shot. At the time of his statement, Smart stated he saw James every day. He stated James walked badly and could not do any manual labor.

Jacob Scriven

Summary of statement of Jacob Scriven, 13 July 1894: Jacob first saw James Perkins in Walterboro, SC after the war ended. It was about 1867. He knew James had pain in his hip because of a bullet wound he received while in the army. He saw James about twice a month to once a week. He knew James suffered with pain in his hip and had difficulty walking. He was not able to do any kind of labor.

George M. Rivers, M.D.

Summary of statement of Dr. George M. Rivers, 19 August 1873: He had examined James Perkins who was a private in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops. He found James to have had a gunshot wound just below the right hip. The skin and flesh had adhered to the muscles causing great pain upon motion. The doctor stated, “He is unfit to follow the plow, and in my opinion he is likely to get worse as he grows older.”

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 13 July 1874: He was wounded in the right hip at the Battle of Ocean Pond or Olustee, FL on 24 February 1864. He was taken prisoner there and carried to Tallahassee. From there, he was taken to Andersonville, GA and from there to Goldsboro. From Goldsboro, he went to Wilmington, NC where he was exchanged, and then to Annapolis Hospital. He remained in the hospital for about one month. He was furloughed to New Bern and went into the hospital again. After that, he went to Alexandria Soldiers Rest and stayed there a month. From that place, he went to Fortress Monroe and remained about 16 days. He was then sent to Brazos Island, TX and then on to New Orleans, LA where he stayed for one month. He was sent to Bedlows Island, NY and from there to Beaufort, SC where he joined his command and regiment.

Surgeons’ Examinations

Summary of Examining Surgeon’s Certificate, 20 August 1884: James Perkins, upon examination, was found to have had an injury to his right groin. The ball entered there about the middle and went out on the opposite side, near the hip joint. It splintered the bone. Scars were plain to see at the entry and exit points. His sciatic nerve was affected at the time of the examination, and he had pain from the hip joint to the ankle on his right side.

Summary of Surgeon’s Certificate, 4 January 1888: James Perkins received a gunshot wound of his right thigh. The missile entered the upper part of the thigh and exited a little above and beyond the greater trochanter of the femur. The scar on the front of his leg was very tender on pressure and there were adhesions to the tissues below. The scar on the back of the leg was not tender and had no adhesions. There was no limitation of movement of his hip joint. James suffered from chronic rheumatism.

Summary of Surgeon’s Certificate, 3 October 1888: James Perkins received a gunshot wound of the right groin while in the service. In 1876, two pieces of bone were extracted from the exit wound. He complained of great pain in his hip and that prevented him from performing manual labor. He was not lame at the time of the examination.

Summary of Surgeon’s Certificate, 10 September 1890: Upon examination, there was evidence of a gunshot would of the right thigh. He was also suffering from pterygium of both eyes with the right worse than the left. The injury was caused by the explosion of a gun cap. James stated he also suffered from a dislocation of the right shoulder.

Summary of Surgeon’s Certificate, 3 April 1895: When James Perkins was examined, he complained of a dislocation of his right shoulder. But no evidence of that was found. There were no signs or symptoms of rheumatism either in the right shoulder joint or in any other joint. Evidence was found of a gunshot wound of the right hip. The scar was tender at the point of entry but not adherent. The scar at the point of exit was also tender but not adherent. There was slight atrophy of the gluteal muscles and the back of the thigh. Motion in the right hip joint was somewhat limited and painful, with the right leg being weak.

Summary of Surgeon’s Certificate, 5 December 1906: James Perkins stated he was born in Pitt County, NC. At the time of the examination, he was 5-feet 6-inches tall, 150 lbs. His complexion and eyes were brown; his hair was light gray. He was a cobbler. A wound of his right thigh was found with scars at the points of entrance and exit. The scars were not tender but were adherent at the exit point. He was found to have a disease of the eyes. His joints were stiff and painful when flexed or twisted but there was no swelling. His loss of motion was ½ degree. His muscles were flabby.

Summary of Surgeon’s Certificate, 1 February 1899: Evidence of a bullet wound was found on James Perkins’ right thigh and at the back of his hip. There was no evidence of an injury to his right eye and no evidence of a right shoulder injury. He was found to have some trouble with his heart and complained of attacks of syncope. His pulse was extremely rapid and very feeble.

A.C. Washington and Kitt McHoney

Summary of statements of A.C. Washington and Kitt McHoney, 29 July 1925: They stated they were present at the death of James Perkins on 20 May 1925. He died at Round O, SC. They believed his death was caused by dropsy. They knew Betsey Perkins, James’ widow, before and after her marriage to James on 12 April 1886.

Betsey Perkins

Summary of statement of Betsey Perkins, 4 June 1925: She stated she was born 11 July 1850 at Jacksonboro, SC. She was the widow of James Perkins who enlisted at New Bern, SC on 27 May 1863 in Company K, 35th Regiment US Army Colored Troops. He was discharged 1 June 1866. He died 20 May 1925 at him home in Round, SC. She married him on 28 February 1868 under the name Betsey Singleton at Jacksonboro, SC. Rev. James Jenkins married them. She did not marry after James’ death.

Marriage Certificate, James Perkins and Betsey

Summary of Certificate of Marriage, 29 July 1925: James Perkins and Betsy were joined in marriage on 28 February 1868. J. Jenkins performed the marriage and witnesses were Bock Porry, Smart Hamilton, and Kitt McHoney. The ceremony was performed at James Perkins’ residence. Betsey lived with James as his wife until his death.

 

Marriage Certificate, James Perkins and Betsey Singleton

 

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 13 April 1912: James Perkins was born in Pitt County, NC. He was about 23-years old when he enlisted on 29 May 1863. He was discharged 1 June 1866. He fought in the battles at Olustee and Morris Island. He was in the hospital at New Bern, NC. Capt. Armstrong and Lt. Ladd were officers in his company. Sgt. Dudley was also in his company. James’ wife was named Betsey. His comrades were Benj West, a sergeant; Henry Chapman, a sergeant; Reuben Moselle, and Daniel Sanders. At enlistment, James was 5-feet 6-inches tall, with colored complexion, and black eyes and hair.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 20 April 1915: He stated he was born 12 June 1840 in Pitts County, NC. He served in Company K, 35th Regiment US Colored Troops. He was married to Betsey Singleton on 28 February 1868 by Rev. John Butler. He did not receive a marriage paper. James and Betsey had the following children: Henrietta, born 25 November 1868 and Charles J., born 11 October 1870. On 12 April 1886, James obtained a marriage certificate from the church, Trinity A.M.E. Church, Rev. J. Jenkins officiating minister.

Marriage Certificate

Summary of Certificate of Marriage, 12 April 1886: James Perkins of North Carolina and Betsey Perkins of Round O were joined in marriage. Bock Parry, Smart Hamilton, and Kitt McHoney were witnesses.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 15 January 1898: He was married to Betsey Singleton on 28 February 1868 by Rev. John Butler who died before James could get a marriage certificate. On 12 April 1886, Rev. J. Jenkins gave him a certificate. James and Betsey had two children, Henrietta and Charles J. Perkins.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 14 May 1901: He stated he was born in 1840 and, at the time of his statement, was living at Iron Cross Roads, Jacksonboro, Colleton County, SC. He mended shoes and was receiving a pension.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 14 May 1901: He stated Simon Manigault was present when James signed one of his papers. Smart Hamilton lived on an adjoining lot at Iron X Roads and Henrietta Dawson also lived near him. Ben Powell went with James to Mr. Ackerman’s office. James stated he was “cupped” in the head while in the service and Powell knew all about it. They were on Folly Island together. David King was a member of James’ company and was with him during all of his sickness in the army. Caesar Chisolm testified for James in 1900. Charley Perkins, James’ son, was there at Mr. Ackerman’s office and testified for James. James stated he paid Mr. Ackerman sometimes 25-cents, sometimes 50-cents, sometimes nothing, and sometimes he fixed his shoes for him. He also sent him a hog and sometimes gave him a chicken.

Smart Hamilton

Summary of statement of Smart Hamilton, 14 May 1901: He stated he was a farmer living near Iron X Roads, Jacksonboro, SC. He touched the pen in James Perkins’ pension claim and Henry Ackerman was there. Henrietta Dawson was also there. He stated he knew James Perkins for about 40 years. He also stated that Caesar Chisolm was there.

Henrietta Dawson

Summary of statement of Henrietta Dawson, 14 May 1901: She stated she was born the first day of freedom. She testified for James Perkins in 1900. Smart Hamilton was also there and he touched the pen. Henry Ackerman was there as well.

Simon Manigault

Summary of statement of Simon Manigault, 14 May 1901: He stated he never saw James Perkins sing or swear to any paper in his pension claim. He also stated he was not present when Smart Hamilton and Henrietta Dawson served as witnesses in James Perkins’ claim.

Benjamin Powell

Summary of statement of Benjamin Powell, 14 May 1901: He served in the same company and regiment as did James Perkins. They were mess mates and lived within eight miles of each other ever since the war. Benjamin knew James had been hurt by a gun cap and also had an accident on one of the islands near Charleston.

Charles Blake

Summary of statement of Charles Blake, 17 May 1901: He was a farmer and knew James Perkins when James was in the army. Charles and James lived in the same neighborhood ever since the war.

David King

Summary of statement of David King, 23 May 1901: He served in the same company and regiment as did James Perkins.

Robert Haynes

Summary of statement of Robert Haynes, 22 May 1901: He stated he never signed a pension form for any person. He told Mr. Ackerman to sign Robert’s name and Ackerman did so.

P.M. Jaques

Summary of statement of P.M. Jaques, 22 May 1901: He stated he had signed a pension form for James Perkins. C.P. Chisolm was present when he signed it.

William Wahington

Summary of statement of Wm Washington, 17 May 1901: He was a witness in the pension claim of James Perkins. He stated he saw James when they were in the army though they served in different regiments.

Caesar P. Chisolm

Summary of statement of Caesar P. Chisolm, 17 May 1901: He stated he signed a paper in James Perkins’ pension claim before Henry Ackerman. Smart Hamilton was Also there.

J.D. Von Leke

Summary of statement of J.D. Von Leke, 23 May 1901: He stated his signature and seal were on a paper in the pension claim of James Perkins.

Henry W. Ackerman

Summary of statement of Henry W. Ackerman, 22 May 1901: He was a farmer and a Notary Public. He was also a Trial Justice and Magistrate for about 20 years. He stated that Smart Hamilton and Henrietta Dawson made their marks on a paper in the claim of James Perkins. He wrote the names of attesting and identifying witnesses in the claim but they were not sworn. James Perkins never paid him anything except sometimes 50-cents and sometimes 25-cents.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 30 May 1901: He stated David King was in his company and knew all about his army service and disabilities.

James Perkins

Summary of statement of James Perkins, 3 September 1901: He stated he was a shoe cobbler and lived about one mile from Iron X Roads, Jacksonboro, SC. He stated Simon Manigault had been Henry Ackerman’s constable when Ackerman was a Trial Justice. Ben Powell was in James’ company and regiment.

Smart Hamilton

Summary of statement of Smart Hamilton, 3 September 1901: H.W. Ackerman and James Perkins were present when Smart made his mark on a paper in James Perkins’ pension claim. Simon Manigault was not present at that time.

Richard Singleton

Summary of statement of Richard Singleton, 5 September 1901: He knew James Perkins who lived near Iron X Roads. He also knew David King who lived in Walterboro and he knew H.W. Ackerman who had been a Trial Justice. He stated it was not his signature on the paper in the pension claim of James Perkins because he did not know how to write.

Henry Joseph Craven

Summary of statement of Henry Joseph Craven, 5 September 1901: He was acquainted with H.W. Ackerman who had been a Trial Justice. He also knew David King and Richard Singleton.

Benjamin Powell

Summary of statement of Benjamin Powell, 4 September 1901; He stated he served in the same company and regiment as did James Perkins. He knew James lived at Iron X Roads at the time of his statement. James was injured in one eye when the company was at New Bern, NC. James had shot off his gun and the cap popped, striking him in the eye. He was not sure of the year but thought it was 1863 when the injury occurred. He also knew that when the company was at Folly Island, SC, James was run over by Sgt. Cato McClelland when they were drilling. Perkins had fainted and McClelland stumbled and fell on him hurting Perkins’ shoulder. Benjamin knew James was off duty. Dr. Grass treated him. After they mustered out, Benjamin never heard James complain of problems with his eye or shoulder until he filed his pension claim. He stated he had not authorized H.W. Ackerman to sign his name to any of James Perkins’ pension papers.

Burrell R. Smith

Summary of Burrell R. Smith, 4 September 1901: He stated he remembered that James Perkins had fainted and was carried away but he did not pay particular attention to that.

Jacob W. Wright

Summary of statement of Jacob W. Wright, 4 September 1901: He stated he had signed a paper in James Perkins’ pension claim.

Henry W. Ackerman

Summary of statement of Henry W. Ackerman, 29 May 1901: He was presented with a paper purportedly signed by David King with an X, J. Craven, and R. Singleton. Henry W. Ackerman had also signed the paper. He stated the signature was his own. He stated he recognized the signatures of J. Craven and R. Singleton as his own handwriting as well. J. Craven was Joseph Craven and R. Singleton was Richard Singleton. Simon Manigault and Harvell Ackerman were not sworn and did not sigh their names.

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