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Search New Database in FamilySearch.org, South Carolina County Marriage Licenses, 1911-1951

Robin Foster
by Robin Foster
South Carolina. Probate Court (Colleton County). (2001). Colleton County, South Carolina marriage licenses. Salt Lake City, Utah: Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah.
South Carolina. Probate Court (Colleton County). (2001). Colleton County, South Carolina marriage licenses. Salt Lake City, Utah: Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah.

Containing marriage licenses from Colleton County, South Carolina, 1911-1951, this database is near the sites of two former ports of the enslaved during the 19th century. You can also track the earliest recorded marriages of African Americans for the area.

Albert Newton, Anah Mingo, 25 Sep 1915, South Carolina, Colleton County Marriage Licenses, 1911-1951,  Database. FamilySearch. 9 October 2019. South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Columbia.
Albert Newton, Anah Mingo, 25 Sep 1915, South Carolina, Colleton County Marriage Licenses, 1911-1951,  Database. FamilySearch. 9 October 2019. South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Columbia.

Preliminary Search for African American in South Carolina County Marriage Licenses, 1911-1951

I searched for Albert Newton, the name of the ancestor, to find this marriage record. Knowing that he would have been enslaved prior to 1865, makes him older. Sixty was around the age he would have married.

Ages and names can be difficult to match for African Americans. Albert’s wife was recorded as Anah Mingo in FamilySearch, however, on the license it looked like it was spelled Annah. Finding more records can give you other ways of spelling names. Each different spelling should be recorded.

We need to access the Research Wiki to discover more records for Albert Newton. This will help to determine more ways his and his wife’s name were spelled, and we can find them on records using those names.

Finding More Records Can Assist You in Making Sure You Have the Right Ancestor

In order to find more resources for Albert Newton, you need to find more records generated in Colleton County, South Carolina. The easiest place to do this is by searching the Research Wiki at FamilySearch for that county:

Colleton County, South Carolina, Research Wiki, https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Colleton_County,_South_Carolina_Genealogy
Colleton County, South Carolina, Research Wiki, https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Colleton_County,_South_Carolina_Genealogy

Next, you need to find records that were generated during the time he lived in Colleton County. These resources are online and offline. Try searching online for him first.

For example, search these places first:

  • Census
  • Church – African American churches are not listed. The local library can give you clues, or newspaper obituaries might mention name of churches.
  • Cemeteries – The names of cemeteries may appear in obituaries or death certificates.
  • Death certificates

Any new places you discover that are not listed on the Research Wiki can be entered there, making it easier for the next person who comes along. You can also let me know of any resources, and I can add them. I am the FamilySearch moderator for South Carolina: SavingStories

Sharpen the Saw

Here is a death certificate that could match Albert Newton:

"South Carolina Deaths, 1915-1965," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DBLQ-RZ3?cc=1417492&wc=M6Y6-329%3A30804801 : 18 April 2016), 004177722 > image 319 of 1568; Department of Archives and History, State Records Center, Columbia.
“South Carolina Deaths, 1915-1965,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DBLQ-RZ3?cc=1417492&wc=M6Y6-329%3A30804801 : 18 April 2016), 004177722 > image 319 of 1568; Department of Archives and History, State Records Center, Columbia.

Anna Newton was his wife. He was born around 1856 which is close to the age he would have been in enslavement. How else could we prove or rule out this as being the correct death certificate? Let us know in our Facebook Group.

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