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Washington, Simon. USCT Pension File Abstract, Company G 34th USCT, Combahee, Colleton, SC

Biographical Summary

Simon Washington was born about 1845 on Newport Plantation on the Combahee River in Beaufort County, SC. His parents were Thomas Washington and Daphne. His brother Uriah Washington was raised on the same plantation. Simon was enslaved by William Middleton. He was married to Rachael/Rachel Grant at Combahee, Beaufort County, SC in March 1873. Rachel was also enslaved by William Middleton and was raised at Newport Plantation. Her parents were John Grant and Mollie. Together, Simon and Rachel had 11 children.

Simon died at Jacksonville, Duval County, FL on 31 January 1910 and was buried 2 February 1910.

In their testimony in this pension file, 13 witnesses revealed the name of their final slaveholder.

Testimony of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

USCT Service

Simon Washington was a private in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Volunteer Infantry.  He enlisted in June 1863 and was discharged in March 1866.

Status of Pension Application

Simon Washington first applied for a disability pension under the Act of June 27, 1890. His pension claim application was assigned the number #698,606. It was determined that he was entitled to a pension of $10 per month commencing 16 Dec 1908. He was assigned pension certificate #711,640.

After Simon Washington’s death, his widow Rachel applied for a widow’s pension. Her claim application was assigned #938,210. 

Due to conflicting information in Simon’s original pension application and Rachel’s application concerning the soldier’s marriage and date of death, the case was referred to a Special Examiner Dow McClain. McClain was to take testimony to determine if Rachel Washington was the legal widow of Simon Washington.

In a letter to Dow McClain dated 14 Nov 1910, the Auditor for the War Department summarized the conflicting testimony: Rachel Washington alleged in a declaration filed 17 March 1910 that she was the widow of Simon Washington who served in Company G, 34th US Colored Infantry and who died at Jacksonville, FL on 31 January 1910. She stated she married Simon under the name Rachel Grant in March 1873. Rev. Joe Garrison performed the ceremony at Combahee, Beaufort County, SC. In his original pension application dated 6 December 1897, Simon stated he was married to Rachel White in 1871 by Rev. Garrison of Beaufort, SC.

In her testimony given to Special Examiner McClain on 5 Oct 1910 (see below), Rachel Washington explained the discrepancy between the maiden name she gave in her application and the name Simon gave in his original testimony. She stated that she took her surname as Grant after her father’s surname of Grant. After her father died, her mother remarried to a man named White, and people sometimes called her Rachel White.

The testimony of other witnesses corroborated this information, and Special Examiner McClain recommended that Rachel’s claim as the widow of Simon Washington be admitted for consideration.

Summary of Testimony

T.N. Roberts, M.D.

Summary of report of Dr. T.N. Roberts, 2 July 1895: Simon Washington, having been a private in Company G, 24th [should be 34th] Regiment US Colored Troops, was examined 19 June 1895. He was found to have had a bayonet wound in his left leg and a headache. There was a sore on the lower portion of his left leg from the bayonet wound he received in Fernandina, FL about October 1865. He was found to be 6-feet ½ inches tall and 165 pounds. He was 50 years of age. There was a scar on the lower inner portion of his left leg that was neither tender nor adherent. There was no loss of tissue. The leg appeared in a general diseased condition with signs of previous ulcerations and a sore, scaly condition of the skin. 

Simon Washington

Summary of letter from Simon Washington, 10 April 1903; Simon stated the Postmaster would not answer communications to him about S.S. Deas and would not give a favorable account of personal feelings between him, the Postmaster, and S.S. Deas. Robert Smalls and MacDonald Wilkins, Simon stated, were more reliable than the Postmaster.

Rachael Washington

Testimony of Rachael Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Rachael Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Rachael Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Rachael Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Rachael Washington, 5 October 1910: She was a resident of Dale, Beaufort County, SC and about 66 years of age at the time of her statement. Her youngest child was 23. She stated she was the widow of Simon Washington who served with the Federal army during the Civil War. She stated she was born on the plantation where she was living at the time of her statement and had lived there all of her life. Her father’s name was John Grant and her mother was Mollie White. After Rachael’s father died, her mother “…had a man named White. This is how my father and mother had different names…” Rachael had the same last name as her father. When her mother remarried, people called Rachael by the name of Rachael White after her step-father.

She stated she had neither brothers nor sisters and never had but one husband in her life, Simon Washington. They grew up together, belonging to the same owner in slave time. Simon was born on the plantation where Rachael was living and neither of them lived anywhere else. They were never apart except for when Simon was in the war. They went together from the time Simon returned home from the war until he died. They were together a number of years before they married. When she became pregnant the first time, they married. Their first child, Gabriel, was born about three months after she married Simon. She and Simon had 11 children. She stated Simon died on Monday, 31 January 1910 and he was buried the following Wednesday, 2 February 1910. Rev. Garrison married Rachael and Simon at the church on a Sunday before the whole congregation.

Monday Lighthouse

Summary of statement of Monday Lighthouse, 5 October 1910: He lived near Yemassee, SC and had lived there all of his life. He knew Rachael Washington all of his life and knew she and Simon Washington were married but was not present at the marriage. He stated they had a large family. They lived as man and wife until Simon died. Rachael did not remarry after the death of her husband.

Diana Green

Testimony of Diana Green, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Diana Green, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Diana Green, 5 October 1910: Diana and Rachael Washington belonged to the same owner and grew up together on the same plantation. Diana was Rachael’s cousin. She knew Simon Washington, Rachael’s husband, died on the last day of January and she was there at the burial. Diana knew Simon was Rachael’s first and only husband and that they went together after Simon returned home from the war. Simon never had but one wife, Rachael. Rachael’s father’s last name was Grant and her step-father’s last name was White.

Jonas Gadsden

Summary of statement of Jonas Gadsden, 5 October 1910: He belonged to a plantation that adjoined the one on which Rachel lived when she was a girl. He knew Simon Washington, Rachael’s late husband, and knew he had died in 1910. Neither Rachael nor Simon had been married before marrying each other and Rachael did not remarry after Simon died.

Sunday Briscoe

Testimony of Sunday Briscoe, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Sunday Briscoe, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Sunday Briscoe, 5 October 1910: He and Rachael Washington were first cousins and had the same owner in slave time. Sunday knew that neither Rachael nor Simon had been married before marrying each other. They lived as man and wife until Simon died and she had not remarried after his death.

Jack Aiken and Phoebe Gray

Summary of statements of Jack Aiken and Pheobe Gray, 17 May 1910: They knew Rachael Grant, married name Rachael Washington, all of their lives. They all lived together on Newport Plantation in Beaufort County, SC. Jack and Pheobe were present when Simon Washington and Rachael Grant were married about March 1872 at Bethel Church. Rev. Joe Garrison performed the ceremony. They positively knew that neither Simon nor Rachael had been married before marrying one another. Jack was present when Simon died on 31 January 1910 and they both attended his funeral on 1 [Other statements indicate it was 2 February.] February 1910.

Simon Washington

Testimony of Simon Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Simon Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Simon Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Simon Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Simon Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Simon Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 11 June 1895: Simon was a foreman for Newport Rice plantation and resided there at the time of his statement. He stated he served in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops and was mustered in about June 1863 at Beaufort, SC. He was mustered out at Mt. Pleasant, SC in March 1866. They were discharged at Jacksonville, FL but disbanded at Mt. Pleasant where they turned over their arms and received their pay. He served as a private. Simon claimed a pension because of a bayonet wound of his left leg.

He stated he was enslaved by William Middleton. When he entered the army, he was working as a farm hand. Sunday Alston and Uria Washington, Simon’s brother, were still living on the plantation at the time of Simon’s statement. Walley Garrett, July Hayward, and Solomon Salter lived on Woodstock Plantation. George Bissell was the manager of the planation for six or seven years after the war ended. Capt. Henry Elliott took his place and was in charge for about two years. After him, Robert Holston was the manager for three years. W.F. Colcock followed Holston and was the manager at the time of Simon’s statement. Simon stated he had no sickness while in the army except for an earache that lasted about 24 hours.

He stated his left leg was sound at enlistment. He stated he received the wound to his left leg in October 1865 at Fernandina, FL. Guards were mounted and they were marching in double file. Frank Richardson was in front of Simon and when they “…made a wheel…” he fell down. His bayonet scabbard, with the bayonet in it and the point exposed, stuck Simon’s left leg in the shin as Simon marched over him. Simon stated he felt a “…sting when it stuck my leg as I passed over him and I never thought anything of it until the next morning…” He then noticed swelling in the leg and saw the skin had been scratched on his shin. Simon went to Capt. John P. Hammond and showed him the wound. The captain sent Simon to see Dr. Clay, the hospital surgeon, who put something on it and bandaged it up.

Simon stated he was off duty for about two weeks but was not in the hospital. The wound healed but broke out again about two months after Simon returned home from the army. It healed again but then broke out and continued to do that every year up to the time of his statement. He stated he lived in Charleston, SC for about a year after discharge where he bought a salve to put on the leg. Dr. H.E. Bissell was the only doctor who treated him after the war for the leg wound. Sunday Briscoe, Uriah Washington, Walley Garrett, July Hayward, and Solomon Salters were men who knew of his suffering.

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 19 June 1895: Simon Washington stated he never had a venereal disease of any kind. He said he suffered from headaches all of his life to the point where his head felt as if it were swimming and he was unable to see well when walking or working. Simon stated his father was never in the army. He died at Port Royal Ferry on his way to Beaufort, SC about 1867.

W.F. Colcock

Summary of statement of W.F. Colcock, 11 June 1895: He stated he was a planter who resided on Newport Plantation on the Combahee River, SC. In the winter his Post Office was in Green Pond, SC and in the summer it was at Yemassee, SC. He first met Simon Washington in 1882 when he took charge of the plantation where Simon was living. Simon was his second fireman and had a sore leg ever since W.F. first met Simon. He stated the leg would open up at times and then heal. He stated Simon was laid up nearly the entire summer of 1887 because of his leg and Dr. T.M. Hudson of McPhersonville, Hampton County, SC was called to come and dress the wound. Simon had always told W.F. that his leg was the way it was because of a bayonet wound he received while in the service.

Sunday Briscoe

Testimony of Sunday Briscoe, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Sunday Briscoe, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Sunday Briscoe, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Sunday Briscoe, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Sunday Briscoe, 11 June 1895: He served in Company H, 34th US Colored Troops. He mustered in at Lands End near Hilton Head, SC and mustered out in June or August 1865 at Mt. Pleasant, SC. He knew Simon Washington all of his life, being raised on the same plantation together. Sunday knew Simon was a member of Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops and that he was sound when he enlisted. He knew Simon was injured during his service at Fernandina, FL. Several weeks after Simon was hurt was when Sunday first heard about the injury having been done by a bayonet. He stated Simon’s leg “…was running matter when we were mustered out at Charleston.” He knew Simon complained about his leg a great deal and frequently used a stick to walk. He said Simon would be laid up two or three times each year.

Uriah Washington

Testimony of Uriah Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Uriah Washington, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Uriah Washington, 11 June 1895: He stated he was living on Newport Plantation when his brother, Simon Washington, returned home from the service. Uriah stated Simon had a sore on his leg when he got home and had had it ever since then. Simon told his brother the wound was done by a bayonet. Simon had no other ailment of any kind.

Daphne Wright

Testimony of Daphne Wright, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Daphne Wright, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Daphne Wright, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Daphne Wright, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Daphne Wright, 11 June 1895: She stated her first husband was Thomas Washington, the father of Simon Washington. Simon was their oldest child. She had nine children with Thomas Washington. Her first husband was sickly all of his life and he died in December the year peace was declared. They were all enslaved by Wm Middleton. Some years before his death, her husband had a running sore on his left hip. He was sent to Charleston by his owner for treatment. He also suffered with “…a swimming in his head.” Simon was a healthy boy and free from sores of any kind until he returned home from the army. At that time, his left leg was sore and he had suffered from that ever since that time. He also had a swimming in his head so much so that he almost fell in a fire. Dr. Bissell treated him. Simon had the attacks of swimming at the time of her statement but they were not as often as before. Daphne’s daughter, Mary, died from dropsy after her father’s death. The other children [who had died] died in infancy. Rosetta Green, another daughter, died while giving birth.

Farley Bowers

Summary of statement of Farley Bowers, 12 June 1895: He served in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops. He was mustered into the service at Beaufort, SC in June but could not remember what year. He was mustered out in March at Mt. Pleasant, SC. He was raised on Newport Plantation and returned there after he was discharged. He knew Simon Washington all of his life. He served in the same company and regiment as Simon. When they were stationed there, he was detailed with the carpenters. Simon was stationed at the fort. The day after Simon’s leg was jabbed with a bayonet, Simon went into the town and that was when Farley saw the injury to Simon’s left leg. He knew Simon continued to suffer with it ever since that time. Farley stated that Simon was laid up at times and unable to walk because of the leg injury.

Walley Garrett

Testimony of Walley Garrett, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Walley Garrett, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Walley Garrett, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Walley Garrett, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Walley Garrett, 12 June 1895: He was living on Woodstock Plantation in Beaufort County, SC. He was a corporal in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops. He mustered in about June 1863 at Beaufort, SC and mustered out about March 1866 at Mt. Pleasant, SC. He knew Simon Washington all of his life and they served in the same company and regiment. He knew Simon’s health was good when he enlisted and he had no sores of his legs. He knew Simon was injured in the fall of 1865 at Fernandina, FL but was not present at the time.

Walley stated he may have seen Simon the day after he was injured. Simon went to the town to be treated by Dr. Clay, the regimental surgeon. Simon was on his way to the hospital when Walley saw him. Walley asked what was wrong and Simon said he had received a snag from a bayonet. Simon was stationed about three miles from Walley so they did not see much of each other after the injury happened. Walley knew Simon complained of his leg and had been laid up with it a great deal. At the time of his statement, Walley said he saw Simon about every week.

Walley buried Simon’s father, his death having been caused by heart trouble from dropsy. Simon’s father had no sores about his person that Walley knew of and he knew the man all of his life. Simon’s father died in October 1866 at Port Royal, SC where he had gone for medical treatment. Walley brought the man’s remains back for burial. Walley did not know of Simon’s brothers or sisters having any sores. He did have an Aunt Dolly on his father’s side who died about 12 years before his statement. She had sores from her head to her feet. Walley knew Simon had gone to see Dr. Hutson about 1871 for treatment.

July Hayward

Summary of statement of July Hayward, 12 June 1895: He was a private in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops. He mustered into the service in June at Lands End, SC, near Beaufort. He mustered out in March at Mt. Pleasant but he did not remember the years. He and Simon Washington lived on the same farm and belonged to the same owner, Wm Middleton. At Fernandina, FL, Walley was on guard duty in the town and Simon was stationed in the fort. Walley never knew about Simon’s injury until about two or three years prior to his statement. He remember Simon going to Fernandina, FL to have his leg treated for a bayonet wound.

March Laurence

Testimony of March Laurence, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of March Laurence, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of March Laurence, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of March Laurence, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of March Laurence, 12 July 1895: He mustered into the service in June at Pigeon Point near Beaufort, SC. He did not recall what year it was. He mustered out in March at Mt. Pleasant but did not recall the year. He knew Simon Washington all of his life because they lived on the same plantation and both belonged to Wm Middleton. They served in the same company. March was present at drill in Fernandina, FL when Simon’s left leg was hurt with the point of the bayonet. He said that while performing the short wheel, Sergt. Bono slipped and fell, the point of the bayonet sticking Simon’s leg. He knew Simon had gone to the hospital for treatment. The wound healed but it broke out again and continued to do so up to the time of his statement. March knew that Simon’s father had been treated in Charleston, SC before the war.

Richard Smith

Summary of statement of Richard Smith, 13 June 1895: He served in the same company and regiment as Simon Washington. Richard did not remember anything about Simon’s condition in the service or afterwards. He never knew of Simon having a sore leg.

Hamilton White

Testimony of Hamilton White, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Hamilton White, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Hamilton White, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Hamilton White, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Hamilton White, 13 June 1895: He served in the same company and regiment as Simon Washington. He did not remember when he was mustered into the service but knew it was at Beaufort, SC. He knew he mustered out at Mt. Pleasant, SC. He was raised on Newport Plantation and had known Simon all of his life because he was raised at the same place. Hamilton stated he was at Fernandina, FL with his company and was stationed in the fort. He did not know of Simon having a sore leg after the service and he had lived, for a year, on Newport Plantation, and then about a mile from there. He saw Simon frequently after discharge. He knew Simon’s father, Thomas, but never knew of him having any sores or what caused his death.

Mexico Washington

Summary of statement of Mexico Washington, 13 June 1895: He served in the same company and regiment as Simon Washington. He was mustered in at Lands End near Hilton Head, SC and mustered out at Mt. Pleasant, SC. He could not recall the years. He said Simon’s health was good in the service until they went to Jacksonville, FL. They were in the habit of playing ball in the evening and one evening he asked what had become of Simon. He was told that Simon had been injured by a bayonet. Mexico went back to the camp and saw Simon and “…sure enough the bayonet had gone through his right leg just above his ankle. I saw the wound and I do not know whether he was in Hospital or not.”

Jack Aiken

Testimony of Jack Aiken, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Jack Aiken, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Jack Aiken, 13 June 1895: He was raised on Newport Plantation with Simon Washington and also served with him in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops. Jack knew Simon’s health was good except either at Jacksonville or Fernandina, FL when he was stuck with a bayonet “…in one of his shanks which cripples him down to the present time…” Jack knew Simon’s father but did not remember the condition of his health before Jack entered the army.

Neptune Nichols

Summary of statement of Neptune Nichols, 14 June 1895: He did not know Simon Washington until they entered the service. Neptune knew of nothing affecting Simon when they first met. He did not remember Simon being injured in any way. His condition seemed to be good when they were discharged at the same time. Neptune knew Thos Washington was Simon’s father and he served in Company H, 34th US Colored Troops. He said Thomas was a sickly old man and could not carry a gun but Neptune did not know what was wrong with Thomas.

Edward Brown

Summary of statement of Edward Brown, 14 June 1895: He served in the same company and regiment as Simon Washington. He stated that Simon complained the first time at Morris Island. He complained of weakness and pain in the small of his back. Edward did not recall Simon having been injured or wounded while he was in the service. He and Simon were stationed at the fort at Fernandina, FL and Edward count not recall Simon having any injuries. Edward knew Simon prior to their time in the service because they were raised on opposite sides of the Combahee River near each other.

Lucius Robinson

Testimony of Lucius Robinson, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Lucius Robinson, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Lucius Robinson, 14 June 1895: Simon Washington and Lucius served in the same company and regiment. Lucius knew Simon before they entered the service. Simon was raised at Newport Plantation on the Combahee River and Lucius was raised at Cypress Plantation two miles down the river on the same side. Lucius never knew of Simon being injured or wounded while in the service and they were stationed at the fort at the same time.

Dafney Blay

Testimony of Dafney Blay, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Dafney Blay, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Dafney Blay, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow's Pension Application #938210.
Testimony of Dafney Blay, Pension File of Simon Washington, Pension File Application #698606, Certificate #711640, Widow’s Pension Application #938210.

Summary of statement of Dafney Blay, 15 June 1895: She was raised on the Newport Plantation and was well acquainted with Thomas Washington and his wife, Daphne. They were the parents of Simon Washington. Thomas entered the army and died about a year after the war ended. She knew he had two attacks of boils or sores on his hip before the war. His owner sent him to Charleston, Sc for treatment and he was laid up for some time after each attack. When freedom came, Thomas seemed to have been healed up. In his last attack, he had two sores or boils at once, nearly killing him. Their owner had a sick house and when someone was very sick, they were sent there to be nursed. Thomas was sent there. Dafney stated Thomas had a sister, Doy, who had died some years before Dafney’s statement.

Mingo Vandross

Summary of statement of Mingo Van Dross, 15 June 1895: He and Simon Washington served in the same company and regiment. Mingo had no recollection of Simon being sick, wounded, or injured while in the service. Simon was discharged with Mingo and, Mingo said, there was nothing the matter with him that Mingo knew of.

Jack Grant

Summary of statement of Jack Grant, 15 June 1895: He served in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops with Simon Washington from 1863 to 1866. He never heard Simon make any complaints during his time in the service except once, when he complained of a pain in his shoulder. He and Simon were at the fort in Fernandina, FL at the same time and Jack knew nothing of Simon being wounded or injured.

Anthony Bartlet

Summary of statement of Anthony Bartlet, 15 June 1895: He knew Simon Washington as a young man when they served together in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops. Anthony knew nothing of Simon having been injured or wounded while in the army.

Andrew Nichols

Summary of statement of Andrew Nichols, 15 June 1895: He served with Simon Washington in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops. He knew of nothing ailing Simon while he was in the service. He knew nothing of him having been injured or wounded. He, at the time of his statement, saw Simon occasionally and did not know about him having a sore leg.

William Jones

Summary of statement of William Jones, 19 June 1895: He was a 2nd Sergeant in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Infantry. He did not remember anyone named Simon Washington serving with him. He only remembered Solomon Washington of Company H. William was at Jacksonville and St. Augustine, FL with his company but could not recall any Simon Washington. He stated he was on duty at Fort Fernandina, FL for about a month, guarding six prisoners. There was no one hurt in the shin or anywhere else with a bayonet while he was there and they never went there “for fight.”

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 11 June 1895: He stated Nathan Bickford of Washington, D.C. and Henry Chisolm of Dale, SC were helping with the prosecution of his claim for a pension.

Rachael Washington

Summary of statement of Rachael Washington, 27 April 1910: She was married to Simon Washington in March 1873. Her maiden name was Rachael Grant. H.B. Barnwell and Abram Polite also appeared and stated they knew Rachael Washington to be the lawful widow of Simon Washington. They attended Simon’s funeral.

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 16 February 1892: Simon Washington was a resident of Combahee, Beaufort County, SC. He had served in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops, enlisting in June 1863. He was discharged at Mt. Pleasant, SC on 16 March 1866. He stated he was 2/3 unable to earn support by manual labor because of a bayonet wound he received at Fernandina Fort, FL while “…guard mounting by a comrade.”

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 7 August 1899: Simon stated he was 56 years of age and was entitled to a pension because of wounds received in the leg at Fernandina [FL]. He stated he was partly unable to perform any kind of labor whatsoever.

N.J. Kennedy, M.D.

Summary of report of Dr. N.J. Kennedy, 22 April 1896: He stated he had examined Simon Washington and found him suffering with varicose veins of the left leg. They extended from the knee to the angle. There were also several ulcers on the lower third of the same leg, causing weakness, swelling, and considerable pain in the knee and hip joints. Simon was unable to stand but for a short time.

H.E. Bissell, M.D.

Summary of report of Dr. H.E. Bissell, 12 February 1897: The doctor stated he lived near Simon and was his family physician. He knew Simon had a chronic rheumatism of the lower left leg caused by a bayonet wound during the service. The doctor stated Simon was still suffering from the effects of the wound and was rendered incapacitated from doing any more than one-half of a laborer’s work. Simon suffered from varicose veins in his left leg as well.

Charles Scott and Moses Evans

Summary of statements of Charles Scott and Moses Evans, both of White Oak Plantation, Beaufort County, SC, 16 March 1900: They knew Simon Washington suffered from rheumatism of both hips and pain in his back. They knew he was wholly unable to perform manual labor. They had worked on the same place as where Simon lived for the 12 years prior to their statements.

J.W. Fields

Summary of statement of J.W. Fields, 11 November 1902: He had been acquainted with Simon Washington and knew he had been afflicted with rheumatism in his back and legs since 1880. J.W. stated that because of his conditions, Simon was unable to perform a good day’s manual labor to support himself. He had know Simon since about 1878 because they lived in the same neighborhood.

James Blake and Mexico Washington

Summary of statements of James Blake and Mexico Washington, 25 July 1903: They knew Simon Washington had been afflicted with rheumatic pains in the back and left shoulder and pain and cramps in the left leg since about 1880. They knew he had been unable to perform manual labor since about November 1902. They lived in the same neighborhood as Simon for about 40 years.

B.S. Kittler, M.D.

Summary of report of Dr. B.S. Kittler, 6 June 1904: He had been acquainted with Simon Washington for six years. He examined Simon and found him to be suffering from rheumatism of the left side commencing in the shoulder joint and extending to the hip and knee. He would also, at times, be affected below the knee to the ankle joint. The doctor stated Simon was not totally disabled and could perform some manual labor when not suffering pain.

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 4 May 1907: Simon stated he enlisted in June 1863 as a private in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Volunteer Infantry. He served in the Civil War and was honorably discharged at Mt. Pleasant, SC in March 1865.

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 5 March 1908: He stated there was no public, baptismal, family or any other record that he knew of as to the date of his birth. The only thing he knew was that when he enlisted, he was a young man of about 19 or 20 years of age. At the time of his statement, he was adjudged to be about 63 years of age.

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 26 March 1899: He stated he served as a private in Company G, 34th US Colored Troops commanded by Capt. Hammond. He was honorably discharged at Mt. Pleasant, SC in March 1866. At the time of his statement, he was described as being 41 years of age, 5-feet 6-inches tall, and his complexion, eyes, and hair were dark. He stated that in the summer of 1865, while stationed at the fort, at or near Fernandina, FL, he incurred a bayonet stab in his left leg below the knee. He stated that while going on guard, the man in front of him fell, and as Simon attempted to step over him, the man’s bayonet stuck in Simon’s leg.

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 15 June 1892: He was living in Green Pond, Colleton County, SC at the time of his statement. He had served in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops. He enlisted in June 1863 at Beaufort, SC and was discharged in March 1866 at Charleston, SC. He claimed disability because of constant pain in his left leg and hip caused by a bayonet wound that was accidently inflected by a comrade while Simon was on duty. The injury happened at Fernandina Fort, FL.

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 15 June 1892: While mounting guard at Fernandina, FL about November 1865, Simon received a bayonet wound in his left leg above the ankle. The man whom he was covering fell and his bayonet pulled upward. As Simon advanced, he was pierced in his leg with the bayonet causing him to be laid up for about three weeks. The wound healed but then broke out, again causing him to be laid up for several weeks. He stated the wound continued to do this at the time of his statement.

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 14 July 1896: He was not able furnish the affidavit of any of his commissioned officers as to the origin of his disability. He did not know where they were. Neither did he know where the Orderly Sergeant, the surgeon, nor the assistant surgeon were. He stated he was treated by Dr. Hansom while he was in the service for the wound in his leg.

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 5 February 1894: He could not furnish evidence of his commissioned officers or surgeon to show the circumstances surrounding the bayonet wound he received. He did not know where Capt. John G. Hammond or Lt. Andrew H[illegible] were. The Regimental Surgeon was Dr. Hansom who left the regiment at Jacksonville, FL and was sent to garrison Fernandina, FL. Dr. Hansom treated Simon at Fernandina.

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 24 January 1903: He stated he was born at Combahee, Beaufort County, SC. He was living at Combahee, SC when he enlisted at Beaufort, SC. His occupation was that of a farmer. He was a slave to William Middleton when he enlisted. Simon stated he was discharged at Mt. Pleasant, SC and had lived at Combahee, SC since that time, working as a farmer. He stated he was 5-feet 6-inches tall and his skin was black.

Mexico Washington

Summary of statement of Mexico Washington, 14 July 1891: He stated he knew Simon Washington before they joined the army. They were in the same regiment but Mexico was in Company H and Simon was in Company G. They two companies always camped beside each other and Mexico saw Simon on a daily basis. He stated he had seen Simon when his company was going to Fernandina, FL and when he saw him the next time, it was in Jacksonville, FL. When Mexico saw Simon in Jacksonville, Simon was limping but he had not bee limping in Fernandina. Simon told Mexico he had been stuck by a bayonet in his leg and show Mexico and others the wound he had received.

Walley Garrett

Summary of statement of Wally Garrett, 5 February 1894: Wally stated he was a corporal in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops at Fernandina, FL. He knew Simon had gone from the fort there to the town in order to receive treatment for a bayonet wound in his left leg. The wound broke out again, about 1871, some years after they mustered out. Dr. T. Hutson treated Simon at that time.

Jack Aiken

Summary of statement of Jack Aiken, 5 March 1894: He served in the same company and regiment as did Simon Washington. They were on guard one morning about October 1865 and Simon was in the rear rank. The man immediately in front of Simon slipped and fell, his bayonet on his gun entering the left leg of Simon, just below the knee.

James Sheppard

Summary of statement of James Sheppard, 5 March 1894: He and Simon Washington were privates in the same company and regiment. While they were on guard one morning in October 1865, Simon, who was in the rear rank, was stuck by a bayonet in his left leg. The man in front of him had fallen and his bayonet pierced Simon’s leg.

July Hayward

Summary of statement of July Hayward, 3 February 1894: He was in Company G, 34th Regiment US Colored Troops. Simon Washington was in the same company and regiment. While in Fernandina, FL, Simon went from the fort to the town to be treated for a bayonet wound in his left leg.

July Hayward

Summary of letter from July Hayward, 25 August 1894: He stated he was not with Simon Washington in the service and did not know whether Simon was injured or not.

July Hayward

Summary of letter from July Hayward, 22 October 1894: He stated his last affidavit was entirely correct as he never saw the accident that caused Simon Washington’s wound but he did see Simon when he went to Fernandina, FL to see the doctor.

Phoebe Gray and Charles Washington

Summary of statements of Phoebe Gray and Charles Washington, 27 April 1892: They were farmers and near neighbors of Simon Washington. They had worked with him since 1866 and 1880 respectively. They had worked with Simon on the Newport Plantation daily for many years and knew Simon to be continuously complaining from pain caused by a wound in his left leg, just below the knee. They knew him to be incapacitated for work half of the time and he was only about to earn about 50-cents per day when he could work. He would have been able to earn $1 per day if he could have worked all day.

Arthur Prioleau, M.D.

Summary of report of Dr. Arthur Prioleau, 18 February 1891: He examined Simon Washington and found him to be 5-feet 10-inches tall, 166 pounds, and 43 years of age. Simon had a scar from a puncture wound on his left leg, just above the ankle. There were also several scars from indolent ulcers, one of which was open and inflamed. Simon stated the ulcers had troubled him ever since he was wounded in his leg and that his leg was very painful.

Summary of report of Medical Review Board, 15 July 1903: Upon examination, Simon Washington was found to have rheumatism affecting his hips, shoulders, and legs. Stiffness and limitation of motion was found but there were no contractions of the muscles or tendons. He was found to have varicose veins of the right leg with some veins enlarged to almost twice their normal size. A bayonet wound of the left leg was found but the scar was neither tender nor dragging.

Summary of report of Medical Review Board, 7 September 1904: Simon Washington’s heart and lungs were normal. There was stiffness and thickening of fibrous structures with wasting of the muscles in the gluteal region and crepitus upon forced motion of his shoulders with limitation of motion. He had varicose veins on both legs, about twice their normal size. There was a scar on the front portion of his left leg about the middle of the limb. The scar was neither tender nor dragging and it was about the size of a 25-cent piece. 

Rachael Washington

Summary of statement of Rachael Washington, 12 March 1910: Rachael Washington stated she was married to Simon Washington under the name of Rachael Grant. They were married in March 1873 by Rev. Joe Garrison at Combahee, Beaufort County, SC.

Rachael Washington

Summary of statement of Rachael Washington, 27 April 1910: She stated the only record of Simon Washington’s death was kept by the preacher, Wally Garrett. She did not have a physician treating her husband in his last illness so there is no doctor’s record of his death.

Simon Washington

Summary of statement of Simon Washington, 29 November 1897: He stated he was married to Rachel Washington whose maiden name was Rachel White. They were married in 1871 by Rev. Garrison of Beaufort, SC. Children that were living at the time of his statement were: Gabriel, 20 years old; Rose, 18 years old; Molly, 15 years old; James, 14 years old; Emelia, 9 years old; Tilla, 7 years old; and Bessie, 3 years old.

Walley Garrett and Abram Smalls

Summary of statements of Walley Garrett and Abram Smalls, 27 April 1910: They were personally acquainted with Simon Washington and Rachael Grant prior to their marriage in 1873. They knew neither Simon nor Rachael had been previously married. They had known both Simon and Rachael all of their lives. They knew Rachael did not remarry after the death of Simon.

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